Dev Bootcamp Reviews

4.4 / 5

Austin, New York, Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco, San Diego

all bootcamps

If you are accepted into Dev Bootcamp, you will definitely be prepared. They have two phases of preparation. Prep and Phase 0. Phase 0 is a 9 week phase requiring about 15-20 hours of work a week. During this phase, you will be working with teachers via video chats and programming with other students from your class. It should feel a lot like Dev Bootcamp, but remote. In addition to this, they offer prep material for students who want to do preparation before Phase 0. You can take a look at some of that prep work here.

Aside from the prep work, once you get on-site, Dev Bootcamp practices a flipped classroom. A traditional classroom experience is structured so you learn skills in a group and then get hands on practice as an individual. At Dev Bootcamp, you learn individually through videos and tutorials and then practice the skills you learned in group projects.

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. You will need to create an account to apply.

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http://www.devbootcamp.com

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Dev Bootcamp programs
Programs Cities Duration Cost
Program: Bootcamp Cities: Austin, New York, Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco, San Diego Duration: 10 weeks Cost: $13,950 in NYC & SF and $12,700 everywhere else
No experience is necessary to enlist in Dev Bootcamp’s nine-week intensive program, which includes 80+ hours of weekly studies and hands-on coding projects. The bootcamp also includes one week of career prep, and nine more weeks of part-time studies (that segment of the program can be completed remotely.) Dev Bootcamp graduates have landed jobs as junior developers at an array of small, medium, and giant companies – including Apple and Twitter.
Dev Bootcamp reviews

9 reviews

Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

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It was a great community. I learned a lot, but also made new friends. I learned the proper work flow and really felt prepared to get a job in tech.

Answered by graduate Laura Evans on July 19th, 2016

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DevBootcamp was one of the best experiences of my life. Years before attending DBC I had attended a four year college, I would trade that for DBC any day. If you want to learn how to code and make connections in the industry this is the place for you.

Answered by graduate Michael Angelo on July 19th, 2016

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Single handedly one of thebest career moves I have made. I not only got into a fired I wanted but also learned how much I can push myself. It was incredible and I cannot recommend it enough

Answered by graduate James Kirkpatrick on July 19th, 2016

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Overall, I think DBC is good. I think it's nice that they teach you pair programming and helps promote better developer culture. I think the engineering empathy they teach would help anyone new to programming get through the hard parts and help reach an individuals potential.

Answered by Anonymous on July 20th, 2016

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I enjoyed the content and speed of the Bootcamp very much. They helped me learn a lot of material as well as a different style over learning. I wish the program was more encouraging after I finished the part-time online web development program to help move me towards new steps. It felt like at the end date the program dropped off the side of the earth.

Answered by Anonymous on July 21st, 2016

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One of the best experiences of my life! I loved the amazing teachers and coaches who made everything possible. For such a short and intense program, I thought DBC did a great job teaching students how to learn.

Answered by Anonymous on August 16th, 2016

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Potentially life changing--but the potential part is mostly up to you. Don't expect the instructors to connect all of the dots for you and say, learn A-B-C and you will be a web developer. You must go the extra mile yourself and figure out the "why's" and the reasoning behind what you are taught. This is by design (the goal is for you to become self-sufficient and self-teaching). Personally, I think this design is a bit misguided, but that's the way it is.

Answered by Anonymous on August 16th, 2016

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Overall great. Ended up with some great teachers, and got a lot out of it. It's not an easy, instant ticket into the industry, you still have to really hustle to graduate and then keep that momentum up afterward to get a developer job. You get out what you put in.

Answered by graduate Scott Warner on August 17th, 2016

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If you put all your effort into it, then you will be rewarded. I put over 900 hours in, learned so much more than what I thought was capable in 9 weeks, and got a great job in 1 month. It's worth noting that I think that's true for any (good) bootcamp. Other than that, DBC's got a great, friendly, welcoming, weird culture, and I love that about them.

Answered by graduate Shiv K on August 17th, 2016

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Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

How would you describe the culture at Dev Bootcamp?

Posted by Anonymous on July 19th, 2016

Answer

There was a real sense of community. It was very welcoming and encouraged learning as a community. It was a safe space. Even though we all came in at different levels I never felt like I couldn't complete the challenges.

Answered by graduate Laura Evans on July 19th, 2016

DevBootcamp is a social learning environment that focuses on the mind, body, and soul of the student. You will code all day everyday, but they have many breaks from the daily grind ie. Yoga, Improv, Engineering Empathy and more.

Answered by graduate Michael Angelo on July 19th, 2016

Warm and welcoming. They made sure to remain inclusive, and create a safe environment where people can learn without feeling their peers were judging them. They also made sure to help you keep a work life balance

Answered by graduate James Kirkpatrick on July 19th, 2016

It was great for beginners. There were frequent google hangouts with when I did the online section of it, which was great if you needed help. I did the course after I studied Ruby on my own, and the basics of RAILS, which I thought helped me a lot. I also went in with a degree in Computer Science which I thought helped a lot.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on July 20th, 2016

It is inclusive, energetic, encouraging, team based and supportive. I enjoyed everyone's willingness to work together and learn from each other.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on July 21st, 2016

Very friendly, receptive to feedback, safe, and inviting. I appreciate how DBC values empathy and takes the time to do activities that bond the cohort together. Having a strong bond with your cohort not only brings good relationships but the opportunity to learn from different people and learn something new or to a greater extent.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

You will find in this industry that the word "culture" is often a code word for "group think." This is no less true at DBC. Their culture is built on good intentions, but deviate from it at your own risk. I was genuinely uncomfortable with some exercises, and my hesitation was definitely noticed negatively and used to penalize me post-graduation.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

A lot of fun. They do a lot of team-building stuff which is important. Its not just coding exercises. Yoga puts a nice break in the day. I enjoyed my time there, even though I was working very hard and was extremely tired at the end of them.

Answered by graduate Scott Warner on August 17th, 2016

Pretty good. They're all super weird and fun. It's a very inviting environment. Some of the engineering empathy stuff was odd, especially since it's not reflective of a real work setting, but I didn't mind it. Also, the fact that new classes cycle through every 3 weeks meant that you never really feel like you own the space, which I heard was awesome for DBC's early classes where it was only them in the space for 9-12 weeks.

Answered by graduate Shiv K on August 17th, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Anonymous on July 19th, 2016

Answer

They were pretty good. I wish we had one consistent instructor for all 3 phases, but each teacher had a different teaching style was nice. They took the time to answer all of our questions and genuinely cared about our learning.

Answered by graduate Laura Evans on July 19th, 2016

They were great! There is a strong presence of talent and knowledge amongst the teachers, they have all worked at solid companies like Google, Amazon etc. The part that I loved the most is that they would really teach you how to teach yourself, which is an asset in actual work place.

Answered by graduate Michael Angelo on July 19th, 2016

Incredibly, I found that within days I was using topics that had completely baffled me shortly beforehand. They were constantly available and understanding of the pressure involved in a bootcamp setting

Answered by graduate James Kirkpatrick on July 19th, 2016

I personally was not very impressed with the instructors. I think a lot of them were new graduates of DBC which I thought didn't make too much sense because they were new themselves helping other people who were also new. I didn't learn anything significant from most of the instructors. I did get one piece of helpful feedback from one of the instructors thought, so I guess not all bad.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on July 20th, 2016

They helped push you forward and past any bumps along the way. They also offered valuable feedback on both coding and working with other coders.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on July 21st, 2016

I think it helps to have a cohort lead that stays with the cohort through every phase and teachers per phase. That way, I was able to learn from various people but also have someone who has been with me from the beginning of my learning process and knows best how to help me.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

This is not really a useful question, since not one of the instructors that was teaching when I attended is still teaching today. Two are still DBC employees in different capacities, but the rest are just gone. The turnover (among all DBC employees, really) is just incredible.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

Very. Thankful I ended up with the instructors that I did. My cohort instructor took the time to get to know me and make sure I was really learning fundamentals, as well as enjoying my time there.

Answered by graduate Scott Warner on August 17th, 2016

Other than being sometimes difficult to track down or being occupied by one of the other 15 people in my cohort, they were great. They were definitely the best resource for getting unstuck and not pissed off at yourself.

Answered by graduate Shiv K on August 17th, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Anonymous on August 16th, 2016

Answer

Work hard, don't forget to relax, and decide that you want it more than you're afraid of it anytime you feel flustered, frustrated, or nervous.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

Take control of your own path. Be relentless in your curiosity, and don't hesitate to demand more of instructors if there is more you want to learn. You are paying for this experience, so make the most of it. Cherish your time on campus and extract as much value as possible from it. You are there to learn, so don't stop learning as long as you are there.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

Don't get complacent. The bootcamp thing happens quickly but it is not an easy process, and nobody will just hand you a job afterward. Keep the momentum up, before, during and after each phase. Once you graduate, you will need to maintain that momentum and take advantage of the fact that DevBootcamp has resources that will help you do that. You get out what you put in, so take advantage of every single resource that DBC has to offer.

Answered by graduate Scott Warner on August 17th, 2016

Say goodbye to all your friends and loved ones for 9 weeks. Then focus all your time on learning how to code. Don't meet up with friends for drinks or go to any networking events. Just focus 100% on learning how to code. The best outcome for you is to be the best software engineer you can be coming out of the bootcamp. The only way to do that is to focus on learning. Everything else is a distraction.

Answered by graduate Shiv K on August 17th, 2016

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