Dev Bootcamp Reviews

4.2 / 5

Austin, New York, Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco, San Diego

all bootcamps

If you are accepted into Dev Bootcamp, you will definitely be prepared. They have two phases of preparation. Prep and Phase 0. Phase 0 is a 9 week phase requiring about 15-20 hours of work a week. During this phase, you will be working with teachers via video chats and programming with other students from your class. It should feel a lot like Dev Bootcamp, but remote. In addition to this, they offer prep material for students who want to do preparation before Phase 0. You can take a look at some of that prep work here.

Aside from the prep work, once you get on-site, Dev Bootcamp practices a flipped classroom. A traditional classroom experience is structured so you learn skills in a group and then get hands on practice as an individual. At Dev Bootcamp, you learn individually through videos and tutorials and then practice the skills you learned in group projects.

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. You will need to create an account to apply.

Ruby on Rails JavaScript jQuery Git HTML CSS

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http://www.devbootcamp.com

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Dev Bootcamp programs

Programs Cities Duration Cost
Program: Bootcamp Cities: Austin, New York, Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco, San Diego Duration: 10 weeks Cost: $13,950 in NYC & SF and $12,700 everywhere else
No experience is necessary to enlist in Dev Bootcamp’s nine-week intensive program, which includes 80+ hours of weekly studies and hands-on coding projects. The bootcamp also includes one week of career prep, and nine more weeks of part-time studies (that segment of the program can be completed remotely.) Dev Bootcamp graduates have landed jobs as junior developers at an array of small, medium, and giant companies – including Apple and Twitter.

Dev Bootcamp reviews

39 reviews

Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    It was a great community. I learned a lot, but also made new friends. I learned the proper work flow and really felt prepared to get a job in tech.

    Answered by graduate Laura Evans on July 19th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    DevBootcamp was one of the best experiences of my life. Years before attending DBC I had attended a four year college, I would trade that for DBC any day. If you want to learn how to code and make connections in the industry this is the place for you.

    Answered by graduate Michael Angelo on July 19th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Single handedly one of thebest career moves I have made. I not only got into a fired I wanted but also learned how much I can push myself. It was incredible and I cannot recommend it enough

    Answered by graduate James Kirkpatrick on July 19th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Overall, I think DBC is good. I think it's nice that they teach you pair programming and helps promote better developer culture. I think the engineering empathy they teach would help anyone new to programming get through the hard parts and help reach an individuals potential.

    Answered by Anonymous on July 20th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    I enjoyed the content and speed of the Bootcamp very much. They helped me learn a lot of material as well as a different style over learning. I wish the program was more encouraging after I finished the part-time online web development program to help move me towards new steps. It felt like at the end date the program dropped off the side of the earth.

    Answered by Anonymous on July 21st, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    One of the best experiences of my life! I loved the amazing teachers and coaches who made everything possible. For such a short and intense program, I thought DBC did a great job teaching students how to learn.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 16th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Potentially life changing--but the potential part is mostly up to you. Don't expect the instructors to connect all of the dots for you and say, learn A-B-C and you will be a web developer. You must go the extra mile yourself and figure out the "why's" and the reasoning behind what you are taught. This is by design (the goal is for you to become self-sufficient and self-teaching). Personally, I think this design is a bit misguided, but that's the way it is.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 16th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Overall great. Ended up with some great teachers, and got a lot out of it. It's not an easy, instant ticket into the industry, you still have to really hustle to graduate and then keep that momentum up afterward to get a developer job. You get out what you put in.

    Answered by graduate Scott Warner on August 17th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    If you put all your effort into it, then you will be rewarded. I put over 900 hours in, learned so much more than what I thought was capable in 9 weeks, and got a great job in 1 month. It's worth noting that I think that's true for any (good) bootcamp. Other than that, DBC's got a great, friendly, welcoming, weird culture, and I love that about them.

    Answered by graduate Shiv K on August 17th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    The skill move you will get is not zero to one (ie musk book). It's .1 to .6 or 0 to .4, or .5 to .9. Clearly best for the .1 skill level folks.

    Answered by graduate Bretton A on September 14th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Attention to detail, willingness to rapidly implement feedback to improve curriculum and program, positive and encouraging work environment, dedication to student success post-program

    Answered by graduate Erica P on September 14th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Great staff. Good physical environment for learning. Strong selection of classmates to learn from.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 14th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    The balance between learning actual code, learning new ways of learning, and learning how to work as a team is a delicate equilibrium that Dev Bootcamp has fine tuned and perfected. I didn't just learn how to code at DBC, I learned how to problem solve and be more aware of my mental processes and interpersonal relationships‰ÛÓskills I've been able to apply not just in my new career, but in life. Thanks to DBC, I've become a more well-rounded person with more opportunities and prospects than I ever imagined for myself.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 14th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    It was a mismatch to my learning style. I'm a depth learner who likes to take deep dives into the material,so a 9 week program wasn't the best. That's as much on me as it is on DBC. Also, I didn't feel like there was enough instructional support. It's fine to say that students need to learn from one another, but at one point that starts to sound like an excuse for not hiring enough faculty. There were student and recent alumnae/i TAs, but in many cases, they were not qualified to provide assistance.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 15th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    It was tremendously helpful to be in an environment of motivated programmers; the program also resulted in me working in software, where I still am. So, I'm glad I did it. However, in terms of accomplishing the educational objectives it promised me, it fell far short. I joined the program to get the help that I could not get while learning on my own, but DBC did not provide that. Despite blazing through the introductory coding part of the course, I ran into trouble with Rails and often asked for help to build up a good mental model of what was going on, and I never got a satisfactory answer. Instead, they seemed to be just as confused on core concepts and guessed the answers. By the end, virtually all of the class could not write Rails apps at the level promised. I still can't (in part because of moving on to other frameworks once finding my first job).

    Answered by Anonymous on September 15th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    One of the most efficient learning environments I've ever been in. Some of the politics around students being asked to leave could be improved

    Answered by graduate Zac M on September 15th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    It was an excellent curriculum. But as a program, it's not oriented as a program to create opportunities for jr developers, but more accept as many students as possible to profit from the lucrative field of education.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 15th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Huge focus on learning, which is what you'll be doing for the rest of your career. The holistic style was not something I originally sought out, but it was the biggest takeaway. I enrolled just wanting to learn to code and left learning more about myself and working with humans - and this is coming from someone that is from the south and spent years working in hospitality.

    Answered by graduate Madison S on September 15th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Trying to train people 'from the ground up' while maintaining a high standard as well as an up-to-date curriculum is an almost impossible task. Trust the bootcamp concept's pioneers at DBC to get it right. And the 'engineering empathy' focus is not just icing on the cake but an integral part of your experience.

    Answered by graduate Philipp Blume on September 15th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    It was an amazing experience it pushed me mentally and taught me above all else, how to constantly learn and gave me the tools to be a life long developer

    Answered by Anonymous on September 16th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Dev Bootcamp was a valuable experience that jump started my career and gave me the tools to grow and become the programmer that I am today. Monetarily in year since I graduated all costs of the Bootcamp and living without work have been paid off and I'm now making about 3x as much (admittedly in a most expensive location) as I was previously. DBC is an environment that fosters ownership over your own learning and keeps you sane while you do it. It's hard work. But it's rewarding and it sets you up to keep growing.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 16th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    I think the teacher to student ratio could have been better and the cohorts were really large compared to what my friends experienced as little as a year prior.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 16th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    The creation of a growth mindset, not a focus on the technology exclusively

    Answered by graduate Robin Soubry on September 16th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Overall really good environment and well put together curriculum (2 years ago)

    Answered by Anonymous on September 17th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    DevBootcamp's lesson plan and staff give a genuine sense of understanding of the way the whole web works, something I found to be deeply satisfying. DBC's methodology strongly values giving you the tools you need in order to learn more in the fast-changing world of web development. This is easily the most valuable skill I attained there; within 9 weeks onsite, there simply isn't enough time to provide mastery of any one of the skill sets needed to succeed in the field. I graduating with an understanding of what makes up back- and front-end development, and what I might want to pursue. In addition, the career services are robust, and encourage you toward connecting with a community in your area. The effectiveness of this approach‰ÛÒ contrasted to sending out resumes blindly‰ÛÒ can't be overstated. DBC places value on working with other people. Your classmates will be people you get to know very well, and learning to navigate around strengths and weaknesses in a team is an incredibly important skill. Nowhere else I looked made clear the value in this skill set. I'd go back in a heartbeat, although that speaks to how well the environment fit my tendency toward collaborative learning. Despite the fact that I see myself as an introverted person, engaging consistently with people who cared about what I cared about was an enlivening experience for me, and I'd recommend it.

    Answered by graduate Caroline K on September 19th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    It was pretty good. The pacing is nice and it's a great learning experience. It's too intense and short and the technologies they teach are outdated. That would probably all be fine but there are too many people there that aren't particularly apt at coding and cohorts have become unwieldy in terms of size.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 19th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Dev Bootcamp is the only bootcamp which offers excellent education of both software development and emotional intelligence. It has changed my life for the better. I love what I do, and I appreciate everything that Dev Bootcamp did to help me get to this place in my life. The reason I give only 4 out of 5 stars is that I wish the curriculum at Dev Bootcamp was more challenging. My perception is that DBC has fallen off a little bit from its competitors, especially at Hack Reactor and App Academy. I think a more rigorous curriculum would give a greater advantage as they seek employment.

    Answered by graduate Cari W on September 19th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    I loved the fast-paced environment and the passion for self-motivation at DBC. The material was very comprehensive and the teachers ensured that we learned everything we needed to progress. I also loved the engineering empathy sessions and thought it helped me work more effectively with my cohort.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 19th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Amazing learning experience. The focus on how to learn was most important, much more important than the actual technologies learned. However, I think that DBC should have focused more on a MEAN stack approach (as it is more in demand than Rails).

    Answered by Anonymous on September 19th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Overall great curriculum. Could be better oriented for Javascript/jQuery. Careers could be better at preparing students. Teachers were phenomenal for the most part. However, the teachers who became teachers right after attending DBC were a hit and miss. With no real world experience, they had little to say about questions that had anythign to do beyond DBC. E.g. "How common is this framework used?" "In a large scale application or company, how would #{so and so} be used?}. Additionally, these teachers were not as adept at teaching or advising on anything that remotely exceeded the DBC curriculum, which undermined their credibility the deeper students went through the program (phase 3). A big concern now is that a lot of teachers that I thought were phenomenal have left. A lot has to do with better career paths and such, but a lot has to do with the life style of the teacher too. Too many students and cohorts. No time to work on their own projects or careers. Additionally, pumping out 20-30 students every three months might be great as a revenue source, but it only saturates the market. And DBC's differentiators are no longer as prominent as the quick production of DBC grads look almost identical to the other 5+ bootcamps churning out the same amount of students.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 19th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    The staff and learning environment was spectacular. But felt there could be more javascript knowledge taught. The career service for after graduation was lacking, there are events and efforts but the effectiveness is low. You are mostly on your own to find a job afterwards.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 19th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    I thought the educations was very comprehensive and well presented. I was quite critical of career week, but they have since overhauled their careers team.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 19th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Dev Bootcamp changed my life immensely! I worked really hard, and so did they. The agile structure of the bootcamp, the way they actively tune in to the local community, the knowledge, experience and care the instructors exhibited all worked toward making my bootcamp experience a fantastic one for learning the basics of a new craft. The curriculum was laid out in a way that build naturally into the next step, and the structure of the course was designed in a way that treats computer science and particularly web development as a learnable field/trade, rather than a mystical magic that can only reside on the tallest mountain top, available only to the smartest few. It's not rocket science, but even if it was, rocket science could be learned if someone takes the time to present the concepts to you in easily accessible pieces, like Dev Bootcamp does for Web Development.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 20th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    It was a great program for me. I entered with enough knowledge that I wasn't totally lost or overwhelmed, but I still learned a LOT. The pace was intense, but doable, and I really enhanced my skill set. I also got a job within 2 months of graduation as a Software Engineer working with client and server side Javascript. Whether or not you do well at Dev Bootcamp really depends on your commitment and level of preparedness. Also, you should be prepared for an intense academic experience and have adequate study/work habits to sustain it. Also the company has changed a lot since I was there, so I can't speak to it now. Hence 4 stars.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 20th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    It was a great program. I loved the instructors and the community that it creates. I do wish that I had learned Javascript and better JS front end frameworks as apposed to Ruby on Rails and Backbone.js. Knowing Ruby is marketable and will be marketable moving forward, but I would have had a lot more opportunities right out of the gate if I had known Javascript.

    Answered by graduate Matt G on September 20th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Incredible focus on learning how to learn and providing opportunities to learn the right content (full stack dev) with diverse instruction team, in various settings - lectures, pair programming, team projects, and independent coding challenges.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 20th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    5

    Answered by graduate Ryan Lesson on September 20th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Definitely room for improvement, especially on the career prep but an amazing program that leaves you excited for a career in web development!

    Answered by Anonymous on September 20th, 2016

  • Dev Bootcamp review

    Dev Bootcamp did a good job of providing me with the skills necessary to land a job as a software developer. The curriculum does a good job of developing a working knowledge of Ruby on Rails, Javascript, SQL, Git, etc. I personally was not super fond of the daily pairing sessions, but understand the importance and benefits of pair-programming. The teachers were solid, and are there to guide you throughout the program.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 22nd, 2016

Talk with Dev Bootcamp graduates

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Bootcamp grads love to talk. We'll find students from Dev Bootcamp to answer your questions.

Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

How would you describe the culture at Dev Bootcamp?

Posted by Anonymous on July 19th, 2016

Answer

There was a real sense of community. It was very welcoming and encouraged learning as a community. It was a safe space. Even though we all came in at different levels I never felt like I couldn't complete the challenges.

Answered by graduate Laura Evans on July 19th, 2016

DevBootcamp is a social learning environment that focuses on the mind, body, and soul of the student. You will code all day everyday, but they have many breaks from the daily grind ie. Yoga, Improv, Engineering Empathy and more.

Answered by graduate Michael Angelo on July 19th, 2016

Warm and welcoming. They made sure to remain inclusive, and create a safe environment where people can learn without feeling their peers were judging them. They also made sure to help you keep a work life balance

Answered by graduate James Kirkpatrick on July 19th, 2016

It was great for beginners. There were frequent google hangouts with when I did the online section of it, which was great if you needed help. I did the course after I studied Ruby on my own, and the basics of RAILS, which I thought helped me a lot. I also went in with a degree in Computer Science which I thought helped a lot.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on July 20th, 2016

It is inclusive, energetic, encouraging, team based and supportive. I enjoyed everyone's willingness to work together and learn from each other.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on July 21st, 2016

Very friendly, receptive to feedback, safe, and inviting. I appreciate how DBC values empathy and takes the time to do activities that bond the cohort together. Having a strong bond with your cohort not only brings good relationships but the opportunity to learn from different people and learn something new or to a greater extent.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

You will find in this industry that the word "culture" is often a code word for "group think." This is no less true at DBC. Their culture is built on good intentions, but deviate from it at your own risk. I was genuinely uncomfortable with some exercises, and my hesitation was definitely noticed negatively and used to penalize me post-graduation.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

A lot of fun. They do a lot of team-building stuff which is important. Its not just coding exercises. Yoga puts a nice break in the day. I enjoyed my time there, even though I was working very hard and was extremely tired at the end of them.

Answered by graduate Scott Warner on August 17th, 2016

Pretty good. They're all super weird and fun. It's a very inviting environment. Some of the engineering empathy stuff was odd, especially since it's not reflective of a real work setting, but I didn't mind it. Also, the fact that new classes cycle through every 3 weeks meant that you never really feel like you own the space, which I heard was awesome for DBC's early classes where it was only them in the space for 9-12 weeks.

Answered by graduate Shiv K on August 17th, 2016

intense, friendly.

Answered by graduate Bretton A on September 14th, 2016

supportive, kind, feedback-oriented (constructive criticism), camaraderie, lasting friendships

Answered by graduate Erica P on September 14th, 2016

Open, no ego, collaborative.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

My experience with the other students at Dev Bootcamp was really positive. Yeah, there were some occasional personality clashes due to the wide diversity, but the staff at DBC was great at mediating and helped everyone learn more about themselves and more about other people from these interpersonal conflicts. Overall, everyone was really helpful and took turns sharing knowledge and receiving knowledge. I saw the cohorts really bonding, and I think all the more so because of the diversity and technical and interpersonal challenges overcome together.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

Overall people were respectful. The program skews very young. It seemed like the age range topped out at 30, give or take a few years. I think the program could have benefitted from a more diverse student body. People like to ignore age-ism in the tech industry, or believe that a person is "old" at 30, and this program certainly isn't helping that issue. Also, when I was there, there was a definite party culture going on. Lots of drinking and smoking weed even during class hours. I'm all for both of these activities, but I paid 13k plus to go to school, not to attend a frat party. I think that some of the instructors turned a blind eye because they wanted to be perceived as cool. Not cool, and not professional. On an academic note, this is not a program for people who like to work solo. There is a huge emphasis on pair programming.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

I liked the culture, in that it motivated me to keep working at problems and get help and learn from others. However, students also walled me off a lot from contributing to projects or shut down my attempts to follow the instructions given, and there was little consequence.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

Great people. A bit of a hive mind, but what tight group isn't ;)

Answered by graduate Zac M on September 15th, 2016

Positive. Outgoing. A bit misogynistic but so is tech in general.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

Very open culture that encourages you to reach in and be a bit vulnerable. Sure, there's the occasional jerk, but that's to be expected anywhere.

Answered by graduate Madison S on September 15th, 2016

high-energy mindfulness

Answered by graduate Philipp Blume on September 15th, 2016

Amazing! The culture is very inclusive and open. It forced me to try new things like yoga and therapy and really did feel like a family

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 16th, 2016

Emotional intelligence is key, and ownership over your learning is emphasized. Going to dbc is like going to summer camp.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 16th, 2016

Open, direct and inclusive

Answered by graduate Robin Soubry on September 16th, 2016

It's pretty awesome. I felt a little "other'd" as a male. A lot of things I wasn't invited to, but no big deal. Everyone is pretty great.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 17th, 2016

The culture is carefully crafted (and regularly reviewed) to protect and act kindly toward all people. It has an inclusive policy that's regularly enforced. The environment, due to the pairing the students do all day, tends to naturally fit extroverts more than introverts, but it's widely understood that different people have different needs.

Answered by graduate Caroline K on September 19th, 2016

Best part of DBC probably. People were extremely thoughtful and empathetic and generally a great atmosphere.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

The culture of Dev Bootcamp is supportive and caring. I truly appreciate the instruction on Emotional Intelligence, as it has been a great benefit since my graduation (almost more than the actual development instruction!). I think that the Friday check-in groups, regular EE sessions, and therapy sessions make the Dev Bootcamp experience truly unique.

Answered by graduate Cari W on September 19th, 2016

Everyone was very open to learning and exploring new ideas. There were also plenty of students and teachers willing to lend extra help when needed. Everyone was very respectful and open to hearing ideas.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Very positive. Hard-working, motivated, focused, diverse, welcoming.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Culture is great. Pair programming was really great. Really promotes great cohort dynamics. But student standards seem to be slipping. A few bad eggs will drastically affect the culture of a cohort.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Very encouraging and open, lots of support and open communication

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

It was amazing. Very awesome place.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

The culture of my cohort, and of the instructors was supportive, openminded, and growth-oriented. The common belief was centered around a learning mindset. The instructors actively worked to diminish negative bias among themselves and the students, and to prepare us not only for careers as software developers, but as open minded software developers who add cultural value to our workplaces.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Amazing. I was skeptical of the 'touchyfeeliness' at first, but it was a great learning environment and I met people who will be friends for life.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Fun, understanding and serious. Everyone helps everybody else. We are all looking out for each other. Also, everyone there wants to be there which creates a great academic culture of like minded individuals.

Answered by graduate Matt G on September 20th, 2016

Inclusive and focused on building a culture of growth and learning, of professional networks and future colleagues, coworkers and friends

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Very supportive and energetic. The culture make coding for extended periods of time well worth it!

Answered by graduate Ryan Lesson on September 20th, 2016

A little wacky..

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

The culture at Dev Bootcamp is inclusive to everyone regardless of gender, race, or sexual orientation. They make it a habit to touch on important matters in tech such as the lack of women and minority programmers. The culture is a lot more favorable to extroverts since you have to pair and interact with others daily.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 22nd, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Anonymous on July 19th, 2016

Answer

They were pretty good. I wish we had one consistent instructor for all 3 phases, but each teacher had a different teaching style was nice. They took the time to answer all of our questions and genuinely cared about our learning.

Answered by graduate Laura Evans on July 19th, 2016

They were great! There is a strong presence of talent and knowledge amongst the teachers, they have all worked at solid companies like Google, Amazon etc. The part that I loved the most is that they would really teach you how to teach yourself, which is an asset in actual work place.

Answered by graduate Michael Angelo on July 19th, 2016

Incredibly, I found that within days I was using topics that had completely baffled me shortly beforehand. They were constantly available and understanding of the pressure involved in a bootcamp setting

Answered by graduate James Kirkpatrick on July 19th, 2016

I personally was not very impressed with the instructors. I think a lot of them were new graduates of DBC which I thought didn't make too much sense because they were new themselves helping other people who were also new. I didn't learn anything significant from most of the instructors. I did get one piece of helpful feedback from one of the instructors thought, so I guess not all bad.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on July 20th, 2016

They helped push you forward and past any bumps along the way. They also offered valuable feedback on both coding and working with other coders.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on July 21st, 2016

I think it helps to have a cohort lead that stays with the cohort through every phase and teachers per phase. That way, I was able to learn from various people but also have someone who has been with me from the beginning of my learning process and knows best how to help me.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

This is not really a useful question, since not one of the instructors that was teaching when I attended is still teaching today. Two are still DBC employees in different capacities, but the rest are just gone. The turnover (among all DBC employees, really) is just incredible.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

Very. Thankful I ended up with the instructors that I did. My cohort instructor took the time to get to know me and make sure I was really learning fundamentals, as well as enjoying my time there.

Answered by graduate Scott Warner on August 17th, 2016

Other than being sometimes difficult to track down or being occupied by one of the other 15 people in my cohort, they were great. They were definitely the best resource for getting unstuck and not pissed off at yourself.

Answered by graduate Shiv K on August 17th, 2016

quite bad. they perhaps have been improved.

Answered by graduate Bretton A on September 14th, 2016

diverse and knowledgeable instructors - if one didn't know the answer, they would find someone who did

Answered by graduate Erica P on September 14th, 2016

All of my instructors were great! None of them spoon-fed us code. It wasn't just about learning the languages and frameworks, but understanding how code is structured and how to ask the right questions to find the answers to problems. They helped me learn HOW TO LEARN code, not just memorize what worked, and I've been able to learn more languages and frameworks at my job because my instructors at Dev Bootcamp didn't teach me just Ruby or Javascript, they taught me how to understand the logic and structure that is at the core of all coding languages.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

I think I've addressed this in my comments above, for the most part. The quality of the instruction varied from great to mediocre.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

As above, poor. I could not get deep answers about the Rails questions I had and instead got "this works, just because". There was little coordination between instructors, so I would be in situations like: Instructor #1: "Solve this problem the object-oriented way. It may seem harder right now, but you have to take this on faith for now, and it will make sense later." Instructor #2: "What the heck are you doing? It makes no sense to apply OOP in this context. Why are you doing it like that?" Me: "Well, I agree, but #1 said..." Instructor #2: "Don't give me that. You need to be able to justify your decisions."

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

Great instructors. Mostly the format of the program is key. Short lectures, fun challenges, cohort bonding, pair programming, individualized help!

Answered by graduate Zac M on September 15th, 2016

Effective. Probably less so for women.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

They were effective in a way that was initially frustrating for someone used to a standard learning environment in that it's very what the students make of it. When I let go of the idea that I should just show up to be educated and took hold of what I wanted to learn, everything went a lot better.

Answered by graduate Madison S on September 15th, 2016

The instructors all had different strengths and weaknesses, but their greatest strength collectively was to acknowledge these and refer students to the best resources if & when the instructors could not themselves be those resources...

Answered by graduate Philipp Blume on September 15th, 2016

Amazing!! I still keep in touch with them

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 16th, 2016

Each instructor touches a different tone with different people.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 16th, 2016

I think overall if you want help you have to work for it. I would say that everyone is provided an advisor and mine was not the best until I told him he was not effective and then he stepped it up. So I would say they are helpful if you make them helpful.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 16th, 2016

The culture is very 'help yourself' in which instructors take a traditional 'teaching role' in the early phases and evolve to helping you find the right docs or debug your code and ultimately let you graduate with confidence.

Answered by graduate Robin Soubry on September 16th, 2016

One completely changed my life. A few other we pretty good, and some others were pretty bad.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 17th, 2016

The instructors were great! Hands-on when you needed them to be and hands-off when you needed time to learn on your own.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

The instructors are uniformly knowledgeable and helpful; sometimes it feels as though there aren't enough to go around for all the questions, although I believe they've employed more graduates as aids in order to fill that need. The different teachers are all individuals too, and their styles sometimes don't fit yours; that's why there's a roster, which I think is one of the strengths of the program. They all are tenacious in their work, making sure you understand and taking time to listen.

Answered by graduate Caroline K on September 19th, 2016

Pretty good. They all have their faults and strengths.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

The instructors are the bread and butter of Dev Bootcamp. I particularly enjoyed Jared's instruction on JavaScript, and Jennifer's instruction on Rails. I thought that Brick did a great job getting Phase 1 up to speed & engaged in the material. Hunter was also a boon to students, as he deeply cared about every student's ability to understand the material.

Answered by graduate Cari W on September 19th, 2016

They were great!

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Most of the instructors were extremely effective. Very knowledgeable and willing to tutor students one-on-one. They were able to break down complex concepts into understandable chunks. The instructors welcomed feedback and tried very hard to continuously improve

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

DBC SF had some really great teachers and cohort guides. Like I said above, the teachers who became teachers with no work experience were a hit and miss.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

I loved all my instructors and thought it was particularly helpful to have teachers who have real world experience and who are articulate.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Very effective, and they knew how to teach to the students as a group, and to the students as individuals.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Incredibly effective. My instructors were industry veterans, most with years of experience working as web devs in RoR, Java, Javascript, and other languages and frameworks.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

The instructors were really good. Unfortunately, many of the ones I had are no longer there.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Depended on the instructor. But, for the most part, very effective.

Answered by graduate Matt G on September 20th, 2016

Great experience with one instructor who does a mix of live coding and blowing your mind in how you think about learning & programming. In a typical lecture you learn 100 new things, get frustrated and overcome a big challenge.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

My instructors were great. All of them were extremely knowledgeable and supportive. Almost any question I had they had an answer and they were always happy to help

Answered by graduate Ryan Lesson on September 20th, 2016

I found the majority of the instructors to be effective and knowledgable on the subject matter. They are not there to solve problems for you, but do well helping to guide you in the right direction so that you are able to learn from your mistakes and struggles. Certain instructors were better than others in a given topic, but that can be said for any teaching institution.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 22nd, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Anonymous on August 16th, 2016

Answer

Start career prep now.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Work hard, don't forget to relax, and decide that you want it more than you're afraid of it anytime you feel flustered, frustrated, or nervous.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

Take control of your own path. Be relentless in your curiosity, and don't hesitate to demand more of instructors if there is more you want to learn. You are paying for this experience, so make the most of it. Cherish your time on campus and extract as much value as possible from it. You are there to learn, so don't stop learning as long as you are there.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

Don't get complacent. The bootcamp thing happens quickly but it is not an easy process, and nobody will just hand you a job afterward. Keep the momentum up, before, during and after each phase. Once you graduate, you will need to maintain that momentum and take advantage of the fact that DevBootcamp has resources that will help you do that. You get out what you put in, so take advantage of every single resource that DBC has to offer.

Answered by graduate Scott Warner on August 17th, 2016

Say goodbye to all your friends and loved ones for 9 weeks. Then focus all your time on learning how to code. Don't meet up with friends for drinks or go to any networking events. Just focus 100% on learning how to code. The best outcome for you is to be the best software engineer you can be coming out of the bootcamp. The only way to do that is to focus on learning. Everything else is a distraction.

Answered by graduate Shiv K on August 17th, 2016

shop around

Answered by graduate Bretton A on September 14th, 2016

prepare to feel like you have no idea what you're doing.

Answered by graduate Erica P on September 14th, 2016

Come prepared to make devbootcamp your number 1 priority. Spend the nights and weekends on your learning to give you a solid foundation towards your career in development.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

My best advice is to go in with no expectations‰ÛÓbe a blank slate. Absorb as much information as you can during lectures without trying to analyze it in the moment. The time for analyzing is when you are actually coding and experimenting with code. If you don't understand a concept, just keep practicing and it will make sense eventually‰ÛÓand by eventually I mean it may even take until after Dev Bootcamp to make sense. The learning journey does not end at DBC. DBC is merely the packing and preparation for the journey (as cliche as that may sound, its true).

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

Think long and hard about how you like to learn (depth vs breadth), and what you want to get out of the program.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

Do a careful search of the available options to ensure it matches your learning style.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

Hop on the code wagon as early as you can

Answered by graduate Zac M on September 15th, 2016

Get a refund.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

The first few weeks are difficult. New people, new structure, and, if you're not computer-science-esque, tough, tough material. It's all tough, but it's not all logic problems. I wish I could have told myself that it wouldn't be logic problems forever, I really considered dropping out in that first phase. Also, the sooner you let go of your expectations, like in anything in life, the better it will go.

Answered by graduate Madison S on September 15th, 2016

Get lots of sleep, don't overdo it. An extra hour in the evening is never as good as the first 5 minutes of the morning.

Answered by graduate Philipp Blume on September 15th, 2016

Embrace the confusion!

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 16th, 2016

Nobody owes you anything. You're paying for the structure and an environment to learn in, not for a new job. What you put into it is directly coorelated with what you get out of it.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 16th, 2016

Do not take phase 0 lightly!

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 16th, 2016

Come in with dedication or don't come in at all

Answered by graduate Robin Soubry on September 16th, 2016

Don't expect the knowledge to come to you. You have to fight and work every step of the way. Be ok with not knowing everything.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 17th, 2016

You get out of it what you put in it. If you spend more time and energy learning the material, you'll fare better after you graduate. Also definitely start networking as soon as you start. The best way to get a job is through connections.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

In retrospect I wish I had worked harder during Phase 0, the online portion of the curriculum, to gain a better understanding of simply how the internet works. There are tons of online courses, videos, and articles; read them and follow any Wikipedia link that confuses you and do your best to understand, broadly, how the medium functions.

Answered by graduate Caroline K on September 19th, 2016

Make sure you love coding. Most students have incredibly long searches that often result in just an internship.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

To the new Dev Bootcamp students: Play hard, Work harder. Take every opportunity to learn, and embrace the struggle you'll encounter. Ask questions as often as you can. Remember to take a moment to breathe, and remember to treat yourself with kindness.

Answered by graduate Cari W on September 19th, 2016

Bootcamps are short. Make the most of the experience. Work as hard as you possibly can. Once it's over, you'll wish it had been longer. Don't stop learning after the bootcamp. Stay focused on your goals and continue to explore new technologies. Also, do freelance work, take some college courses or read books on more complex concepts. Anything to help you continue to get ahead.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Work as hard as you can, and go the extra mile whenever you can. You will get as much out of it as you put in. And the job market is heavily saturated right now, with dozens of other bootcamp grads with identical (1 personal project, 1 final project) portfolios and technical ability like yourself. Additionally, really focus on Algorithms.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Time span for finding a dev job as a new bootcamp graduate can be long and depleting. Your real journey starts after graduation.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

No, but I spent a long time coding before I went.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Be prepared to work hard to develop a strong knowledge base off of which to build once you get a job -- the foundation makes or breaks the house. You only get a few months of this amazing, rich, and astoundingly effective immersive environment so take as much advantage of it as you can while still taking care of yourself.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

TAKE BREAKS when you get stuck. Make sure you sleep an adequate amount. Take CS50.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Make sure you like to code. Try code academy; do a small project; build a simple website. Dev Bootcamp is a big commitment financially, and at the end of the day, Dev Bootcamp sets you up to be a developer -- developing every day. Make sure you enjoy it!

Answered by graduate Matt G on September 20th, 2016

Be ready to be outside your comfort zone and invite challenges in because every relationship, line of code and situation is now a learning opportunity.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Go into everything with an exuberant attitude

Answered by graduate Ryan Lesson on September 20th, 2016

Dev Bootcamp is not the golden ticket to a career as a software developer. They are there to help you attain the necessary skills and guide you through any struggles that you may come across. It is your responsibility to put in max effort throughout the program and to continue building your portfolio afterwards. If you take full ownership of your own learning you will be successful.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 22nd, 2016

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