DevMountain Reviews

4.7 / 5

Salt Lake City, Provo, Dallas, Addison

all bootcamps

DevMountain's mission is to deliver the most impactful coding education in a way that is both accessible and affordable. A small percentage of people can afford to quit their jobs for three months, relocate to another state, and pay huge sums of money in order to learn to code. That's why the majority of DevMountain's courses are offered in an after-hours format so that students can maintain a full-time job while attending. They also have full-time courses as well, in order to meet the needs of some of learners who want to go all-in on programming in an immersive environment.

DevMountain offers courses in both Web Development and iOS Development. Their Web Development course focuses on Javascript as well as HTML, CSS, jQuery, AngularJS, Node.js, Firebase, MySQL, Mongodb, and more. Their iOS course curriculum is written and taught by iOS developers with their students usually progressing far enough to have multiple apps in the store by the end of class.

All DevMountain instructors and mentors also work full-time as developers and are always up to date with the latest trends and technologies. Each DevMountain student is assigned a mentor who they can contact at any time to get help both in and out of class. Mentors have weekly code reviews with students to help them improve and to give them valuable career advice.

UX UI Objective-C XCode JavaScript HTML jQuery CSS Angular-JS Node MongoDB

[email protected]
http://devmounta.in

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DevMountain programs

Programs Cities Duration Cost
Program: Web Dev Immersive Cities: Provo, Salt Lake City, Dallas, Addison Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $10,500
DevMountain offers its full-time web development bootcampers an array of services, including free housing within walking distance of campus. The web development bootcamp curriculum includes AngularJS, Node.JS, React, and databases such as MongoDB. DevMountain’s campus is open 24/7 for its students, and offers many career-oriented services including one-on-one mentoring.
Program: iOS Development Immersive Cities: Salt Lake City Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $10,500
The iOS development bootcamp at DevMountain prepares students to build innovative applications for a variety of Apple devices. All full-time students are offered free housing within walking distance of the DevMountain campus, which is also open 24/7 to allow students to truly immerse themselves into their work. The experience includes career services such as hiring events and access to DevMountain’s employer network.

DevMountain reviews

10 reviews

Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

  • Devmountain Web Dev Immersive review

    I was in their full-time web development program. The instructors are experienced and the also brought in outside working developers to give us talks on what they've been through to understand the market. The classes and mentor aids are very helpful. I would say the program is fairly well put together, but students should be mentally prepared for it as the classes are intense. You will be able to get a developer job out of the bootcamp if you take it seriously and work really hard at it. Also, alumni are always welcome to go back to listen in on new topics and network. They built a coding community with their students and alumni which is very cool.

    Answered by graduate Howard H on July 30th, 2016

  • Devmountain Web Dev Immersive review

    Literally the most transformative educational experience I've ever had. It was the hardest 12 weeks of my life but it was only hard because of the sheer amount of knowledge they unleashed on my brain. I was able to land a job that paid 50% more than my previous marketing job. I can't recommend it more.

    Answered by graduate David Monson on July 30th, 2016

  • Devmountain Web Dev Immersive review

    My experience at DevMountain was monumental to my growth as a software developer. I was discouraged with coding following a few classes at the university level, but the mentorship and immersive experience of DevMountain has given me confidence to find a job in the field.

    Answered by graduate Jordan N on July 30th, 2016

  • Devmountain Web Dev Immersive review

    Learning how to code was not something I would have been able to do on my own -before attending the school. I loved the experience, love the friends I've made, love what I know and continually learn more about. It changed my life for the better, and I am happy to have participated.

    Answered by graduate Phillip P on July 30th, 2016

  • Devmountain Web Dev Immersive review

    DevMountain is an amazing place to learn the skills you need to jump-start your career in Web Development. It's a 3 month long program that dives head first into the world of code, prepare to learn!

    Answered by graduate Alex T on July 30th, 2016

  • Devmountain Web Dev Immersive review

    The first few weeks were great. I enjoyed the instruction and I felt like I was learning really fast. Once project time started I felt like there was less help and the discouragement started to set in when I'd get stuck on certain things.

    Answered by graduate Jake F on August 1st, 2016

  • Devmountain Web Dev Immersive review

    Really enjoyed it. Thought it was a good program that worked at a fast pace to have you up to par by the time the course was over. Would recommend to others

    Answered by graduate Nathan Wilcox on August 1st, 2016

  • Devmountain Web Dev Immersive review

    Amazing experience that helped me realize what I wanted to do with development. It was a lot of work, but it payed off in the end when I got my first dev job.

    Answered by graduate Jake Corry on August 1st, 2016

  • Devmountain Web Dev Immersive review

    Dev Mountain changed my life. Prior to attending I was working in a career field that had me traveling for months at a time. I was missing time with my family. After I graduated from Dev Mountain I found a new career and am now home with my family every day. The instructors were the best and worst thing at Dev Mountain. About two weeks after my cohort started we lost our lead instructor and were in limbo for a couple weeks before we hired a new full time instructor. That didn't really change the things we we learned but it changed the teaching approach slightly and we had to adjust accordingly. But once we got our new instructor he did most of the teaching after he arrived which was awesome. We did have a problem with one of the guest instructors being horrible. We complained about him and at first it seemed like no one listened but then the lead instructor Jeremy stepped up and tried to correct things. He even held an extra learning session for those of us that wanted it. Most of the real learning at Dev Mountain comes after the lesson is over and the mentors help you work through the challenges of the day. The mentors were rock solid when I was going through my bootcamp until about 3/4 of the way through some of them moved on. The replacements were 50/50. I never felt like this hurt my learning at all, it just made me focus more and if I was still stuck I would find a different mentor or classmates to assist me. No biggie. The housing was awesome. It is shared housing and I opted to pay a couple dollars more to have a private room. It was a minute walk to the campus from the apartment. It was only a 15 - 20 min walk to the gym, grocery store and movie theater. The pace of the school was a bit overwhelming at first, which it's designed to be. The pace never slows but adapting to it gets easier. I spent an average of 12 - 14 hrs a day working through everything and still felt like I wasn't learning enough. But by the end of it I was amazed at how much I was able to accomplish. The job search was not as bad as I thought it was going to be. The people at Dev Mountain who help you with preparing to get a job are pretty awesome. Jeff Chapman pushed using LinkedIn to help reach out to companies you were interested in and walked through how to best set up your LinkedIn account and resumes. He brought in outside sources to help you prepare and even did some role playing to get used to asking/answering questions. The lead instructor, Jeremy, also gave us some questions to study based on what we would find when doing interviews and that was very helpful as well. Following all the above I was able to land a Front End dev job in 2 weeks. Again, Dev Mountain was life changing for me and my family. I wish I would have attended it sooner so that I could have that time back with my family.

    Answered by graduate Joe K on August 1st, 2016

  • Devmountain Web Dev Immersive review

    Absolutely great program. I was taught by some of the best and brightest in the industry. That being said, they don't hand you anything. You have to work for it. Their curriculum is great and the mentors I had knew what they were doing, but you still have to put in your own time.

    Answered by graduate Dylan Lott on August 8th, 2016

Talk with DevMountain graduates

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Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

Realistically, can you expect to get a full time job afterwards?

Posted by Todd on November 11th, 2016

Answer
How would you describe the culture at Devmountain?

Posted by Anonymous on July 30th, 2016

Answer

Everyone at DevMountain is friendly and there to help you on your journey to learn. There are mentors and staff their during business hours to offer personal assistance.

Answered by graduate Alex T on July 30th, 2016

Culture is fun and nerdy. They have a cooler with all the sodas developers needs to get going. People are very friendly and they host hackathons to get you on what developers do and have fun with. You basically live and breathe code for 3 months.

Answered by graduate Howard H on July 30th, 2016

Very helpful. Very current on all aspects of development. They really create an optimal environment to succeed. None of the typical beurocratic nonsense you get at colleges/universities.

Answered by graduate David Monson on July 30th, 2016

The culture prioritizes the work you came to do at the bootcamp. There is definitely time for fun and games, so long as it doesn't distract others from their work.

Answered by graduate Jordan N on July 30th, 2016

A very accepting group of individuals with a common goal to not only to succeed as developers, but to help one-another succeed as well. The majority of students at Devmountain come from around the world, and in getting together to learn how to code a very fraternal environment emerges.

Answered by graduate Phillip P on July 30th, 2016

Thought there could maybe be some more interaction between the classes. The culture in our class itself was good. We went to lunches together, studied together, hungout a little

Answered by graduate Nathan Wilcox on August 1st, 2016

Fun, exciting, supportive atmosphere focused on learning. Great instructors and people who really know how to encourage and help you out.

Answered by graduate Jake Corry on August 1st, 2016

The culture at Dev Mountain is pretty laid back. They have xbox's, foosball table and a ping pong table. For the most part they didn't care if/when we played as long as we were respectful of those trying to learn. They brought in breakfast once a week and that was awesome. I never felt like I couldn't approach anyone, even Cahlan. Everyone there was extremely helpful and friendly.

Answered by graduate Joe K on August 1st, 2016

Goal oriented. Focused on learning. There's a sort of "in this together" feeling that I experienced that was really good to have with my group.

Answered by graduate Dylan Lott on August 8th, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Anonymous on July 30th, 2016

Answer

Instructors are good overall. However, students have to work hard at their own pace as well. In coding, It does not matter how good the instructor is, if the student does not work hard to understand it, it's useless. It's a 2-way effort, but mostly on the student's side. They do surveys after each sections of class to get feedbacks from students regarding the instructor who taught it, which I think is very good and a good reason that this bootcamp is successful and growing.

Answered by graduate Howard H on July 30th, 2016

Extremely effective. They pulled in senior developers from local companies to teach each day. They were able to teach relevant best practices that really set you up to be job ready.

Answered by graduate David Monson on July 30th, 2016

Caleb Hicks and the other instructors were the main reason I would attend DevMountain. They are respected developers in the community and are willing to offer one on one assistance.

Answered by graduate Jordan N on July 30th, 2016

Very effective. We as a cohort were fed a firehose of information and were taught how to navigate and make sense of everything thrown at us. You come out of there with the capacity to construct full-stack web and mobile applications, and in turn begin your search for work.

Answered by graduate Phillip P on July 30th, 2016

Our instructors were well versed in the areas they taught. The instructors all have real world experience and teach you everything you need to know to succeed.

Answered by graduate Alex T on July 30th, 2016

Very effective. Ben Norris and Caleb Hicks were awesome instructors. I wished I had a little more one on one time. Maybe more sample projects could solve that problem.

Answered by graduate Jake F on August 1st, 2016

Most of them were money. There were a few that weren't that great of communicators but our course was still new and they were weeding them out.

Answered by graduate Nathan Wilcox on August 1st, 2016

Great instructors that really helped out when I needed and knew how to explain things well. Some were definately better than others, but most of them had gone through the same program and had awesome insights.

Answered by graduate Jake Corry on August 1st, 2016

The guest instructors were pretty good. There was the one exception listed above but that got straightened out. Jeremy was awesome as our lead instructor and enjoyed the lessons he taught. Occasionally the mentors would teach a class/topic and for the most part they were also pretty good. If they didn't teach it well they would work hard afterwards during the challenges to make sure we all got it.

Answered by graduate Joe K on August 1st, 2016

Incredibly helpful, very smart, and very driven individuals. They were all very patient but still motivating. I still keep in touch with my group's mentor and two other mentors from that cohort.

Answered by graduate Dylan Lott on August 8th, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Anonymous on July 30th, 2016

Answer

Be prepared and take everything seriously if you are looking to get into the job market after completing the bootcamp because success and career changes does not come easy. Fun and drinks aside, put your focus on learning the material because that is what will get you a job after you have completed the bootcamp. It is you that hard to teach yourself to code, good instructors can only do so much.

Answered by graduate Howard H on July 30th, 2016

Make sure you are driven to succeed at development before you start. This is not a casual learning experience. You'll want to spend 10-12 hours a day to maximize your experience. Also, come to the Bootcamp with app ideas ready. You'll want to have projects you are passionate about. It makes all the difference.

Answered by graduate David Monson on July 30th, 2016

Attend DevMountain! If you are interested in programming there is no better place to start. They will work with you until you are ready for a job.

Answered by graduate Jordan N on July 30th, 2016

The more base knowledge you have the easier it will be to understand and make sense of what is being taught inside the classroom. If you are looking to attend a bootcamp such as Devmountain be sure to: 1) Solve simple toy problems every single day, slowly augmenting the difficulty. 2) Read and save articles of topics you have yet to make sense of. 3) Make flash cards that contain not just vocabulary, but include also conceptual and comprehensive questions and material. Learning code is a matter of understanding, not regurgitation; you will only get so far by copying and pasting.

Answered by graduate Phillip P on July 30th, 2016

Really study up on the pre-course work to get a head start and be ready to hit the ground running. It may seem overwhelming at first, but I promise you that's normal. As long as you work hard and take advantages of the resources they offer you'll be fine.

Answered by graduate Alex T on July 30th, 2016

Do ALL of the pre course work. Find a buddy that is an experienced developer that can help you when you get stuck. Either that or bug your mentors non stop.

Answered by graduate Jake F on August 1st, 2016

Jump in with both feet, spend the long hours, take it serious, take good notes, make strong connections, connect with classmates on Linkedin

Answered by graduate Nathan Wilcox on August 1st, 2016

Work your butt off to make it worth it. Don't compare yourself to others because you all came from different backgrounds. Spend lots of time on the pre-course work so you can be ready to roll when the course starts.

Answered by graduate Jake Corry on August 1st, 2016

Dev Mountain is going to set you up for success but they can't force you learn and work your butt off. If you decide to join Dev Mountain understand that learning everything is on you. Dev Mountain will provide the resources to be successful but if you don't take advantage of it then you will fail. Work hard and speak up, do not be afraid to say something because chances are most of your class mates don't get it either and if they do then they will reach out and help you to understand better. On that note, find some classmates who you gel with and set up a study group so you have someone to help figure things out. The mentors work hard and if they see you working hard too they will go above and beyond to make sure you are understanding things.

Answered by graduate Joe K on August 1st, 2016

You have to earn it. They're not going to hand it to you. I studied for about 12 hours a day. Take notes on everything. Do every single project in the curriculum. Really hammer out the group projects and refine them as best you can. Make a portfolio that doesn't look like complete ****.

Answered by graduate Dylan Lott on August 8th, 2016

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