Galvanize Reviews

3.8 / 5

Denver, Austin, Seattle, San Francisco, Boulder, Fort Collins

all bootcamps

Galvanize is a company that invests in startups, hosts tech events in its space, and helps to educate the tech community. gSchool is a part of Galvanize's mission to teach tech. It accepts beginners who are passionate about learning but they do caveat that by saying most of their students have a college degree and a technical background.

While there isn't really a day to day breakdown of what you will be doing, expect to spend all day working with instructors learning to code. Outside of the time you will spend in class, you should also expect an additional 20-30 hours a week of reading and project work.

In order to apply, you should fill out their online application (you need to sign in to do this…if they aren't accepting applications then the sign in doesn't work…or generally just doesn't work). It might take up to two weeks to hear back about your application. If you pass their qualifications, you will be invited for an hour long in person or video chat. You should expect a final decision in about a week. Once you get an offer you have one week to submit a deposit to save your space.

Big Data MapReduce Java Data Science Python SQL Statistics Machine Learning JavaScript Node HTML CSS Express

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http://www.galvanize.it/education

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Galvanize programs

Programs Cities Duration Cost
Program: Fullstack Web Development Cities: Denver, Austin, Boulder, Seattle, San Francisco, Fort Collins Duration: 24 weeks Cost: $21,000
Galvanize’s six-month full stack developer bootcamp ends with a career day, during which soon-to-be graduates can meet with dozens of potential employers. At least 97% of Galvanize’s full stack web development bootcamp graduates have landed job with more than 75 companies. The average starting salary for Galvanize-trained web developers is $77,000 a year.
Program: Data Science Cities: Denver, Austin, Seattle, San Francisco Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $16,000
During three months of study, members of Galvanize’s data science bootcamp will work through actual data sets to learn skills such as data munging, modeling, communication, validation, and visualization. At least 94% of Galvanize data science graduates have promptly landed jobs with average annual starting salaries of $114,000.
Program: Data Engineering Cities: Denver, Austin, Seattle, San Francisco Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $16,000
Galvanize’s 12-week data engineering bootcamp prepares graduates not only for careers as data engineers, but also other possible roles including software engineer, data scientist, machine learning engineer, and data product manager. Students have opportunities to network with potential employers during career day. More than 75 companies have hired Galvanize bootcamp graduates.

Galvanize reviews

21 reviews

Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

  • Galvanize Fullstack Web Development review

    I had a great experience at Galvanize. My instructors there were excellent (though none of them are there any longer) and I was impressed with the diverse backgrounds and commitment of most of my peers. I was able to learn enough javascript and ruby in 6 months to produce two projects that I was proud of, and I was able to find a job after graduation thanks to the program's career counseling services. While I think I would have been more confident and prepared had I pursued a full 2 or 4 year CS degree, I'm glad I chose the shorter route.

    Answered by Anonymous on July 28th, 2016

  • Galvanize Fullstack Web Development review

    It was a fantastically immersive program. I was in an earlier cohort so they were still figuring things out but even then I feel like it gave me a strong foundation in web development that led to me joining a startup as a technical cofounder. I went into the program with a relatively strong background in computer science and I still found that there were many ways for me to challenge myself. I went to Galvanize's G-school when it was taught by Turing School of Software and Design instructors. I think it's important to specify who I was learning from.

    Answered by graduate Quentin Tai on July 29th, 2016

  • Galvanize Fullstack Web Development review

    Positive. I think Galvanize does a solid job of giving someone robust exposure to modern DS/ML work, as well as forces them to learn & learn how to learn. As being part of cohort 6, there were still things I would've liked done slightly better (more SQL, hammer home PEP8 / coding best practices) - to which they've addressed the concerns with updated curriculum. I'd recommend. My background for reference: http://indigoinsights.co/2015/03/30/im-enrolling-to-zipfian-academy/

    Answered by graduate G Scott on August 1st, 2016

  • Galvanize Fullstack Web Development review

    Stellar, you get out of it what you put into it. Both my wife and I when through in diff cohorts and 3X our salaries afterwards. It was well worth it for us. Some students came with some experience and others came with none. That did not have any impact on how they did AFTER the program. It was all based on how hard they worked. No bootcamp is the golden ticket, but if they give a damn and teach you "how to learn" then you can always go figure stuff out on your own. They did the best they could to support the large amount of grads they are having. Basically, no one is going to go get you a job afterwards. Students that are struggling to find jobs need to do two things: 1) keep coding everyday, learn something new and show it off. There is a never ending list of new technologies/languages to learn and you will raise your worth big time. 2) Go out and shake hands at events and Meetups. STOP APPLYING FOR JOBS!!! Go meet people and ask them if they are hiring or know anyone who they could refer you to. Leverage your network and if you don't have one, go make one.

    Answered by graduate Tristan Rubadeau on August 3rd, 2016

  • Galvanize Fullstack Web Development review

    Wow, what a generic question. Your survey could use some enhancement.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 2nd, 2016

  • Galvanize Fullstack Web Development review

    Galvanize is out to make money more than anything else. Their curriculum is disorganized as well as their teaching staff. They're hiring choices are below average all around. Save your money and try to teach yourself how to be a developer. If you go into Galvanize you'll end up teaching yourself anyway because you will get barely any help from the teachers.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 9th, 2016

  • Galvanize Fullstack Web Development review

    I love it. Galvanize not only gives me the opportunity to expose myself with various technologies. It also improves my life-long skill of "how to learn". I like how instructors don't just feed me the answer. They encourage us to learn by ourselves and ask questions when we get stuck. It's something that we will be exposed to in the real world, so we should all know how to google questions that we don't know.

    Answered by graduate Chris Chang on August 10th, 2016

  • Galvanize Fullstack Web Development review

    It's a fantastic program. They are always developing their curriculum, and are extremely flexible with following industry trends to keep their students current. It's hard work, but you get out of it what you put into it.

    Answered by graduate Jaylyn S on August 10th, 2016

  • Galvanize Fullstack Web Development review

    Great introductory material but not enough class structure to turn the foundation into application. The limited class structure and flexibility made for a positive environment but perhaps detracted from the overall learning process.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 11th, 2016

  • Galvanize Fullstack Web Development review

    It was an incredible, but very difficult experience. I showed myself that I am capable of learning anything I put my mind to, and can produce work I am proud of under stressful time constraints, both by myself and in a group setting.

    Answered by graduate Louisa Reese on August 11th, 2016

  • Galvanize Fullstack Web Development review

    It was excellent. I really feel that the fact that this course is roughly double the length of most bootcamps makes the difference between knowing and understanding the skills that are taught. Beyond that, the community that you get both with the classmates in your cohort as well as Galvanize alumni and instructors is invaluable when it comes time to move into the workforce. I talk to my former classmates on a daily basis and we leverage each other in a bunch of different ways in order to excel in our careers.

    Answered by graduate Ryan Douglas on August 11th, 2016

  • Galvanize Fullstack Web Development review

    Galvanize is a great place to learn to web development. The instructors really meet each student where she / he is at in their learning and always makes sure everyone is being pushed along at a reasonable pace.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 11th, 2016

  • Galvanize Unspecified review

    The teaching staff was phenomenal. I learned an amazing amount - and all but three of my classmates have found great dev jobs. However, every one of my instructors has since left Galvanize. My feeling is that Galvanize attracts great talent, but can't keep it because the company isn't organized. Also - although I was initially attracted to the 6 month program length, I burned out sometime durning month #4 and stopped retaining as much information.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 15th, 2016

  • Galvanize Unspecified review

    I was self taught for about a year before deciding to jump into Galvanize fulltime. I wanted to get the collaboration experience and direct access to ask my questions as they came up, and was not disappointed. I have been able to connect with a very strong network of colleagues and mentors, and entering the work force felt very confident that I had the skills necessary to be successful in this industry. Galvanize came through on all accounts, and it is the best decision I have made in my professional life. It was an excellent experience that I would highly recommend to anyone considering entering classes at Galvanize.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 15th, 2016

  • Galvanize Unspecified review

    Incredibly poor. We started with 3 teachers. One Galvanize transferred from our class to go teach All State employees how to code. He was not replaced. Another had a child and was never replaced. The other was a Junior Teacher and was made the ONLY teacher. Galvanize also had him doing front-end work on Galvanizes dashboard. He quit mid course and at one point we had no professor at all. They did bring in some TAs in the final month and a halfish but one claimed he was too hungover to help a student and Galvanize took no action against the TA. The majority of the TAs were code school graduates that had graduated from a competing code school (that costs half the price an dis half as long). Some of the TA's didn't even have a full year of experience. One had literally no experience. He was in the cohort before me and graduated when I was 3 months into my program. Incredibly unprofessional. You're paying for the name when you go to Galvanize.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 15th, 2016

  • Galvanize Unspecified review

    Honestly, I thought it was overrated, too expensive, disorganized, and disappointing. Several students wrote letters expressing concerns throughout the program, but all of their questions/concerns went unaddressed. Two of our instructors quit halfway through the program, and the other was fired at the end. To be fair, I have heard other campuses/cohorts had better experiences than mine. My campus/cohort may have been an exception.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 15th, 2016

  • Galvanize Unspecified review

    Excellent program, responsive to a dynamic market. Our class was essentially the pilot for the MEAN stack; despite being guinea pigs, we had solid instruction and curriculum.

    Answered by graduate Barry B on August 16th, 2016

  • Galvanize Unspecified review

    It was good but could have been better. All the instructors, although great, were new to Galvanized and I feel that weakened the learning experience, because they were essentially developing the curriculum as we went along. Also like most bootcamps, they promise that you do not need any prior experience coding, however that's not exactly true. My class was made up of 25 student where most had CS degrees/engineer degrees and/or had been learning to program for a number of years. While that's not a bad thing on its own, I feel classes should have been better organized so that everyone's abilities were more closely matched. But with that said, I still learned a lot and Galvanize continues to be a big help when I need it.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 16th, 2016

  • Galvanize Unspecified review

    The instructors are amazing and one of Galvanize’s best assets. The course is longer and more expensive than others so take that into account when you are looking at bootcamps. While you do get more time with the instructors to go over content (6 months vs. 3 months) understand that it will still be up to you to prove yourself worthy of open positions, there is no magic wand and it may take 3 months plus.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 16th, 2016

  • Galvanize Unspecified review

    Love it! It helped me change careers and make a new life. The instructors are great and peers were supportive and helpful. They respond to student feedback and make changes when necessary.

    Answered by graduate Rachel K on August 17th, 2016

  • Galvanize Unspecified review

    Not a huge fan. When I went, the staff was incredible - but they have changed teachers over and over again and the quality of instruction seems to have decreased.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 17th, 2016

Talk with Galvanize graduates

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Bootcamp grads love to talk. We'll find students from Galvanize to answer your questions.

Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

How would you describe the culture at Galvanize?

Posted by Anonymous on July 29th, 2016

Answer

The people in this program are hardworking, driven, and friendly. There is a strong sense of community and inclusion between all the students, instructors, and mentors.

Answered by graduate Quentin Tai on July 29th, 2016

Positive. Loved the people I learned with. Teachers are smart, but some concerns over turnover. I do enjoy their "Data Scientist in Residence - to which they take previous students and make them "TAs". It's also awesome to be back in an educational environment.

Answered by graduate G Scott on August 1st, 2016

The community and classrooms of Galvanize campuses are awesome. The coworking space has a bunch of companies to go intern with or get a job after. The culture in the classrooms vary on instructor. Learning, laughing and crying will be found in all.

Answered by graduate Tristan Rubadeau on August 3rd, 2016

The culture overall is one of the only positive aspects of Galvanize. There are a lot of sharp people who come around and you have opportunities to learn from them.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 9th, 2016

Everybody at Galvanize is very supportive. I enjoy hanging out with my classmates and be ready to learn together. I'd say that we came together as a family at the end.

Answered by graduate Chris Chang on August 10th, 2016

It's a community of ambitious, passionate, and smart people. The instructors care very much about their students being successful, and you have the freedom to study whatever piques your interest.

Answered by graduate Jaylyn S on August 10th, 2016

Open, lively, and fun. The space itself is well designed and feels appealing. Each instructor and class is probably a bit different but I found the coarse structure to be overly flexible to the point of detriment in learning/retaining the overall coarse material.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 11th, 2016

The community is wonderful, not just the students, which reflect the choices of the admissions people, but the staff as well as the companies who share that space, all promote a culture of inclusion and growth

Answered by graduate Louisa Reese on August 11th, 2016

It's very much a 'students first' mentality, for the most part. People are treated as the adults that they are and allowed to approach the course as equal to the instructors. The fact that every course has roughly four instructors of varying experience levels affords a lot of options for people to approach with questions. The fact that the campuses are housed alongside coworking spaces also allows for a lot of mixing between students and prospective employers.

Answered by graduate Ryan Douglas on August 11th, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Anonymous on July 29th, 2016

Answer

I feel that my instructors were extremely effective. They were all experienced, patient, and strived to make new concepts as easy to learn as possible. They also knew when to step back and let us figure things out on our own so that the material would sink in.

Answered by graduate Quentin Tai on July 29th, 2016

Very, some other cohorts didn't have the same experience though as they cycle through. The instructors at these types of programs are more coder than teacher sometimes. Bear with them and you will get to the answer.

Answered by graduate Tristan Rubadeau on August 3rd, 2016

Very. Maybe if you actually add 'not very effective, someone effective, very effective options'

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 2nd, 2016

The lead instructor was very smart and knowledgeable but was too slammed with other work to be much help. Some of the instructors were consistently high during class, which was a slap in the face since we paid 20k for the class. Overall, the teaching was pathetic.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 9th, 2016

My instructors were very experienced. They were able to tear apart a difficult concept into small pieces with examples, so students with less technical backgrounds could digest easily.

Answered by graduate Chris Chang on August 10th, 2016

We had some trouble with organization about mid-way through the program, but they have long since improved, and all of the instructors are very knowledgeable.

Answered by graduate Jaylyn S on August 10th, 2016

My instructor had plentiful experience as a professional in the field but limited experience as a professional instructor. The syllabus was underdeveloped and there was not effective way to track student progress. The class material and outcomes reflected this.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 11th, 2016

Extremely. They tirelessly worked with us individually or in groups to ensure that we were grasping concepts and able to put them into practice.

Answered by graduate Louisa Reese on August 11th, 2016

Extremely. Our suite of instructors included people who had MS in CompSci (or equivalent), 10+ years of experience each, active open source contributors, etc.

Answered by graduate Ryan Douglas on August 11th, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Anonymous on July 29th, 2016

Answer

The program is what you make of it. It makes available all the tools and resources you could ask for to start you off on your career as a well-rounded and prepared software developer. However, it's up to you to push yourself beyond your limits and make the most of your time. Don't expect handholding, but know that everything you need is there.

Answered by graduate Quentin Tai on July 29th, 2016

Practice basic Python. Practice SQL. Keep Practicing everything! Also, stay late to network, make friends & enjoy the whole experience while you're there!

Answered by graduate G Scott on August 1st, 2016

Shut up and code. When people are being stretched and learning new things they get very uncomfortable. Different people handle this differently. Some will cry, some will lash out at instructors, others will use it as motivation. When in doubt, Shut up and code. Its the only way to get through it and figure this out on your own. Go make something awesome! Do something that you give a shit about and it will show.

Answered by graduate Tristan Rubadeau on August 3rd, 2016

Don't go to Galvanize. If you are intent on going to a Bootcamp in Denver, consider Turing. They were started by the lead instructor who left Galvanize because it was turning into a money making machine.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 9th, 2016

Be prepared to spend more than 8 hours per day. If you can, preview your materials, so on the day of the lecture, you can ask questions that you don't understand. Using external sites such as teamtreehouse or codecademy to teach yourself the fundamental, so you can set up for success.

Answered by graduate Chris Chang on August 10th, 2016

If you like solving puzzles and you're a self-motivated learner, you'll love this course. But you get out of it what you put into it - the instructors are there to help, but no one will hold your hand. Make sure it's really what you want to do before committing 6 months of unemployment to it.

Answered by graduate Jaylyn S on August 10th, 2016

Do not apply to this coarse unless you have very specific, measurable goals from the onset. Make sure your instructor knows what your goals and expectations are so they can help you reach them.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 11th, 2016

Work your ass off and put this experience first for this short amount of time. Research, ask questions, find out why, and have fun.

Answered by graduate Louisa Reese on August 11th, 2016

It's a marathon, not a sprint, so make sure that you're understanding the material as you go. Get in the habit of learning how to look up information, as much of the later parts of the class is focused around teaching you how to stand on your own as a developer. Your classmates are your best longterm resource, so be sure to approach your cohort as a community rather than an amalgamate of different people who happen to be in the same program, and certainly don't approach them as competition as they will be one of your best sources for job leads when the class ends.

Answered by graduate Ryan Douglas on August 11th, 2016

Prepare and do homework. You get as much effort you put into it, and you get what you ask for.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 2nd, 2016

How would you describe the culture at Galvanize?

Posted by Anonymous on August 15th, 2016

Answer

Student culture was friendly and inclusive. There are lots of companies around... but I have to say I didn't interact with them much. Everyone who works for Galvanize is charming and on their game. It's a great atmosphere. The only downside is that things are growing so fast - lots of things fall through the cracks.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

It is easy to be inspired at Galvanize, especially at the Golden Triangle campus. The community is wonderful both inside the classroom and out, and the culture encouraged learning and questions.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

A complete joke. They spout nonsense about how important the learning environment is and then don't even bother putting enough teacher in their classrooms. The actual culture is much different than the growth facade. The company clearly gives no care to how their students perform.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

This is difficult to answer as it depends on the campus you attend, as well as your cohort. Mine was rather toxic. Enthusiasm was low, instructors wouldn't show up to class or have actual lessons planed when they did show up, some class mates didn't get along at all which created tension, etc. However, I have heard great things about other campuses and/or cohorts.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

Close knit, cohesive and supportive. There are a lot of startups and thus a lot of new and exciting ideas floating around. The general atmosphere is one of innovation.

Answered by graduate Barry B on August 16th, 2016

Inspiring. The building is also a co-working place so there are a ton of startups around and there is always some event/talk going on. I loved being among so many entrepreneurs and seeing/eavesdropping on what they're working on. Although it can be a little distracting at times.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Anonymous on August 15th, 2016

Answer

Oh man. I really lucked out. Not only were my instructors great developers, they were also amazing educators. From what I gather, it's really rare to find that combo.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

The instructors were a large part of my success at Galvanize. I was always treated like a professional and an equal, and my questions were taken seriously. The instructors were very thorough and really did an excellent job of not only teaching the class programming fundamentals, but teaching and encouraging us to learn how to learn.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

We only had one instructor. He was not effective at all due to no fault of his own. Galvanize promised a minimum of 3 instructors and we were only provided a Jr whose full time job wasn't just teaching the course. The guy had no choice but to quit to stay sane. I respect his decision as Galvanize put him in a terrible situation. I cannot stress how useless the instructors were. The class would joke about how we might as well all just meet up at a starbucks.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

Aforementioned, 2 quit half way through the program. Our main instructor was unreliable. He would not always show up to class, or he would not have lessons planned out. He was fired after our cohort ended. Both of the instructors that quit however, were great at answering questions. Evan, who I believe is now at the Fort Collins location is a fantastic teacher and communicator.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

All of them were very effective. In addition to guests brought in who were in the industry. Jeff Dean's approach is probably my favorite, he's a straight forward type who always has an answer, or will show you how to find the answer yourself.

Answered by graduate Barry B on August 16th, 2016

They were effective. They were all very helpful, however I do wish they were a little more assertive when it came to completing assignments and more on top of giving code reviews.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

The instructors were fantastic! Some of the smartest people that I have met in my life and yet amazingly patient and down to earth. They take the time to make sure you grasp the material and also have a keen understanding that everybody will learn at their own pace which is perfectly ok. Simply the best.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

My instructors were awesome! They did not make me feel stupid when I didn't know something. They were always willing to help and cared about our success.

Answered by graduate Rachel K on August 17th, 2016

My instructors were incredible - top notch people who worked tireless hours to make sure we learned a ton about software and the industry! None of them currently work for gSchool or Galvanize.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Anonymous on August 15th, 2016

Answer

Try to get a good grasp on the fundamentals - and then make a huge effort to learn on your own. Start doing codewars challenges ASAP and don't stop. Ever.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

Galvanize is an excellent choice for a fullstack immersive program. However, you will not be successful unless you commit 100%, so be ready to work every day. Do all the assignments. Keep up on your projects. Do side projects. Always ask questions. Try new technologies. Collaborate with your classmates, they can be some of the most wonderful people you'll meet, but you have to create the culture. Everyone is part of the culture, and if you commit to becoming a software developer, embracing the community, and help your classmates/allow them to help you, you will be incredibly successful. You don't have to be the best at everything, but if you do the work and listen to your instructors, you actually can be. Effort here will set you up for your coming career really well.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

Get your money back as soon as possible. Explore other options. The company is ran terribly and I'm amazed they haven't been sued. Numerous cohorts have ended up with 1 or no teachers mid course. Its a complete joke. Run. Run as fast as you can.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

Do your research on the specific campus you are considering attending rather than Galvanize as a whole. Try to track down others who have been to that campus or know that campus's instructors, and see if they will give you their honest opinion. If I had done that, I would have chosen a different campus. I do believe that the campus/cohort's instructors will significantly dictate your experience and education at Galvanize.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

Learn to find joy in what will at first be frustration. Each new assignment was a mountain to be scaled at first, but as time went on and the tools became more familiar, the daunting challenges became simply, 'challenges to be accepted'.

Answered by graduate Barry B on August 16th, 2016

Really look into each bootcamp (there are so many in the Bay Area) and find one that is right for you. Ask to audit a class for a day or two and talk to current/past students and instructors. Also, no one is going to hold your hand during the course of a bootcamp and it's easy to lower your guard when everything seems so chill and not so intense from the day to day. So you have to continue to remind yourself that you need to work hard and try to master each thing your instructors goes over. Try to also work on little side projects or add little things to the assignments, this is the time you want to go above and beyond what is expected.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

Prepare as much as possible before starting a bootcamp. Be ready to be overwhelmed and then just hang in there.

Answered by graduate Rachel K on August 17th, 2016

Research and ask tough questions around who is actually running the program and get the actual information around what the hiring outcomes were for the most recent few programs.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

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