Hack Reactor Reviews

4.8 / 5

San Francisco, Remote

all bootcamps

Hack Reactor wants to turn you into a software engineer by teaching you CS fundamentals, full-stack JavaScript and engineering best practices. Through lectures, toy problems and large projects, students learn cutting edge technologies, and become adept at teaching themselves new languages, libraries and frameworks. Students pair program for much of the course, allowing them to learn from one another and fostering crucial communication skills. There are also fun activities that happen in the evening like meetups and guest speakers.

At a macro level, you will spend the first six weeks learning basic skills and learning the mindset of engineers. The next six weeks are devoted to completing a personal project, a short group project and a large group project, giving you experience programming like you would at a developer job. At the end of the program, there is a demo day to show off your projects to potential employers.

While a coding background isn't a requirement, requires you to complete an admissions coding challenge and a technical interview.

JavaScript HTML CSS React Node Algorithms

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http://www.hackreactor.com

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Hack Reactor programs

Programs Cities Duration Cost
Program: Hack Reactor Core Cities: San Francisco, Remote Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $17,780
The 12-week San Francisco-based program offers opportunities for recruits to master the full stack while building a variety of apps, games, and application engines. Hack Reactor graduates earn an average annual salary of $105,000.

Hack Reactor reviews

44 reviews

Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

  • Hack Reactor Remote Beta review

    Delivered precisely what was promised. The entire course is a model of iterative improvement. Curriculum changes to adapt to the most relevant industry trends, and lessons learned from the prior cohort are incorporated into the next to make the program even more effective. You're never just learning one thing; you might learn a completely new framework while implementing the test-driven development you learned yesterday. For example, we learned and wrote an app in Backbone, then the next day we wrote a different app in Backbone... in Coffeescript (which I think was recently replaced in the curriculum with ES6. I also think they may have swapped Backbone for React). Absolutely nothing is wasted, and everything you're doing is intentionally designed to teach you several things at once. I'm completely confident that I could learn any language or framework and become contribution-ready in under a week, easy. Other benefits to Hack Reactor: I discovered how much information I was actually capable of absorbing and implementing at once, I realized that I could work a 72-hour week no problem, I will never be intimidated by a job interview ever again, my professional network exploded in both size and quality, and I didn't waste 2 years or go $100k into debt getting a CS degree (which roughly 40% of engineers don't have, anyway).

    Answered by graduate Neil M on September 12th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Remote Beta review

    Its a nice course to learn a lot of javascript in a short amount of time.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 13th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Remote Beta review

    They were instrumental in giving me the opportunity and skills to find a great paying job.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 13th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Remote Beta review

    Great curriculum and teaching, but I attended over a year ago and I know they're constantly changing the coursework and experimenting with different sprints, so I can't speak for the HR experience nowadays.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 13th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Remote Beta review

    It's thought out from beginning to end. They lay out a path to become an autonomous software engineer. It's clear that the work to get through the program is on the student and it is also made clear that getting a job is a job in itself. They have guidance, encouragement, and systems in place to support job seekers but they're very upfront about the work it takes.

    Answered by graduate Leslie Pajuelo on September 13th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Remote Beta review

    If you were to only look at the curriculum and the price tag Hack Reactor would barely meet expectations. When you tack on immense support from their Hackers-In-Residence, interview preparation, and job search support they're definitely worth the sticker price. However, all of that pales in comparison to connecting with a diffuse cohort of engineers-to-be and becoming a part of their extensive, talented alumni network.

    Answered by graduate Sean Grogg on September 14th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Remote Beta review

    Super accelerated course with good content and guiding. Also Hack Reactor helps past students find jobs even after they already had one.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 14th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Remote Beta review

    Hack Reactor delivered on everything it promised and was a great experience in the process.

    Answered by graduate Casey Woolley on September 18th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Remote Beta review

    As they advertise, they don't take you from 0-60mph, they take you from 20-120mph. Students must already have a base in programming to be admitted to the program. Also their selection criteria is difficult.

    Answered by graduate Abdul T on September 19th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Hack Reactor is a great way to make a career change or learn the fundamentals of web development (servers, databases, and front-end applications) and a brief yet core overview of data structures and algorithms. You'll learn JavaScript in depth, which is by far one of the strengths of the program. You'll build a lot of smaller projects and one main project (your thesis). If you can take 3 months off from work and invest financially (HackReactor's tuition) in an entirely new career, then I think it's a good move. There are other ways to get to a Software Engineering role (others might take more time or cost less money), but HackReactor is rigorous and a great way to condense a lot of learning in a short time frame in a supportive environment with other students who have the same goal as you.

    Answered by graduate Chris Saden on July 27th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Hack Reactor is an incredible institution, and I can't recommend it enough. The price is high, but if you can afford it, the education, network, and resources you have access to are more than worth the tuition. If you are serious about becoming a software engineer and you're willing to put in the work, this is the place for you.

    Answered by graduate Elliot Plant on July 27th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Great school and the students there were all very motivated and intelligent. First couple weeks are spent learning the CS/JS fundamentals which was helpful, then the next 3-4 weeks are about learning new frameworks and tools in JavaScript. Then the final 6 weeks were about building projects which gave students a chance to learn new tech and apply what we learned. Hack Reactor really pushes you and makes you comfortable with being uncomfortable.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 5th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    It was a great experience and I learned more in 3 months than I thought possible. It was one of the most stressful things I've done but it was fun the whole time. Plus I got the job I wanted right after.

    Answered by graduate Dakota p on August 5th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Hack Reactor provided largely a great experience, the curriculum is well structured, relevant and was on point with what I needed to know to get a job a be successful as an engineer. The career curriculum part was outstanding with a lot of effort made to ensure that we were well prepared for interviews.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 9th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Very tough and fast paced but by the time you are finished, you'll come out a confident autonomous Software Engineer. The point of the program is to make you self sufficient and capable of solving problems on your own. There is no hand holding! Which is good because you wouldn't survive in a real work environment if there was. The first half of the course gives you the tools to create whatever it is you want to build. The second half is the project building phase which encourages you to solve a tough problem or create something with depth. You will come out as an expert in Javascript but the true thing you learn is how to learn and solve problems as yourself. Javascript is really just a tool to teach you how to do that. Also, when you graduate, you come out with a network of smart and impressive engineers. Hack Reactor teaches you how to work in a team which is very much like the workplace.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 9th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    They know how to teach you just enough to get a job, plus give you all the tools in order to succeed during your job search. The career help alone was worth it, I think. Very high success rate, and overall good program. There were definitely aspects I didn't love, but the curriculum is very comprehensive and they have a very high success rate.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 9th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    It's a great program run by people that really care about helping their students succeed. It's hard work but it's fun and ultimately worth it if you're trying to transition into software engineering.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 11th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Top notch program with strong instructors and supporting staff. Really enjoyed my time there. As with all programs, there are some kinks they could work on, (which they openly try to address and for which they provide updates) but I got my money's worth.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 2nd, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    I think it's a great program which provides the skills you need to land a job as a professional developer. I can attest to this personally since I do not have a technical background.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 2nd, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    It was a great experience where I learned a lot. The instructors were great and pair programing with other students taught me a lot in a short amount of time. The in person lectures with Marcus were very helpful.

    Answered by graduate Walker Flynn on August 2nd, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    I had a fantastic experience. Hack Reactor is full of brilliant, motivated, and caring people. The staff is made up of excellent teachers who really want to see their students understand the material on a deep level. The students come from so many different fields - but are all intelligent, and driven to become the best programers in the industry.

    Answered by graduate Andrew Bresee on August 2nd, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    I took the 4-week intro course, which I felt was good for a first time coder but is certainly basic. It feels like I learnt a lot about introductory javascript concepts, but there is obviously a much deeper field to study. I chose not to pursue a full hack reactor bootcamp because I doubted it would provide a sufficient foundation to succeed in industry long term.

    Answered by graduate Tim B on August 2nd, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    I would highly recommend it to anyone looking to transition into software. HR does a great job of fostering an environment where you learn how to be a self sufficient engineer. It was by far one of the best decisions I have ever made.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 10th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Hack Reactor was a positive, but rigorous experience. It is a very demanding course that attempts, and does a great job, to accelerate skills and increase a persons ability to be successful at a programming job. The course focused primarily on the front end, but still touched heavily on algorithms, architecture, and backend systems. The best things about HR are it's curriculum constantly adapting to feature new tech and how each cohort is challenged more than the last. A couple words of warning: take the course seriously, some don't. It is almost 18k you're dropping on it. Secondly, the latter half of the course puts a focus on your hire-ability. If you intend to look for a job afterwards, take this seriously as well! Not everything may appear sexy, but they've done this with many students before and will not steer you wrong. Good luck!

    Answered by Anonymous on August 10th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    An excellent opportunity for anyone looking to switch careers into Software Engineering. Hack Reactor gave me the skills, knowledge and ability to exceed expectations of managers here at Red Ventures. Hack Reactor focuses on developing Software Engineers through teaching computer science fundamentals such as Algorithms and Data Structures, the latest technologies relevant to a modern tech company, and how to speak and interact technically at your new position.

    Answered by graduate Justin Zimmerman on August 12th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Best education all experience I had. Very professional staff, excellent student peers, and great job outcome. I wish I had done hack reactor earlier.

    Answered by graduate Michelle He on August 15th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Very high quality learning experience, obvious that much thought and preparation are put into every learning sprint. Amazingly supportive instructors and support staff that is routing for you throughout the intense three month course. Provided me with huge springboard for career change.

    Answered by graduate Autumn Fjeld on August 15th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Great program. Teaches you what you need to know to get an entry level job and continue your learning on your own. It is a lot of fun because everyone there has drive and so much positive energy.

    Answered by graduate Mike L on August 17th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    I received a high quality education and feel comfortable taking on much more difficult programming tasks as a result of attending.

    Answered by graduate Medhir B on September 12th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Extremely hands-on, applied learning. They teach the latest and greatest tech used + great fundamentals of software engineering, creating well-prepared engineers for the job market.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 12th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    It was one of the best experiences I've had. The atmosphere is like no other in terms of support from your peers. I did not think it was possible to change and learn so much in only 3-months. They followed through on everything they advertised and then some... and then some more.

    Answered by graduate John P on September 12th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    The program is very well-designed. Really. There is no room to fuck around. They definitely account for the fact that we're human.

    Answered by graduate Tai H on September 13th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Hack Reactor delivered exactly as it offered -- An immersive program of the skill sets you need to find a software engineering job. I gave them a 4 because I think they can definitely make improvements in accessibility to instructors, and educating students about being more inclusive in the workforce.

    Answered by graduate Danielle B on September 13th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Outstanding course, you are surrounded by motivated and bright minds, and you're pushed to the limit.

    Answered by graduate Sean R on September 14th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Attending Hack Reactor was a life-changing experience. Nothing is perfect, but given what those three months did for me, personally and professionally, I can't give the program anything less than five stars.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 14th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    HackReactor was the greatest learning experience I have ever had. There was a great atmosphere, culture, and the people were amazing.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 15th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Curriculum, teaching staff

    Answered by Anonymous on September 15th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Hack Reactor prepared me to both find a job and do a job. I learned a lot of fundamentals, but more importantly I learned how to work on real projects with a team, a skill that is indispensable (mandatory) for a software engineer.

    Answered by graduate Kurt Weiberth on September 18th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Because it truly pushes you to the limits and gives you the tools, experience and technical proficiency you need to find a job or build your own thing.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 18th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    The curriculum is good, the community great. You graduate being a competent JavaScript engineer using modern frameworks, and an ability to learn new frameworks and languages quickly as needed.

    Answered by graduate Christopher Pruijsen on September 18th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Did a great job preparing me for a javascript specific role and a decent job preparing me for a engineering role. Should have focused a bit more on object oriented inheritance based techniques. Support in finding a job was lacking and I feel like we were mislead into thinking we'd be getting all these interviews when that was certainly not the case as they were far and few between. I felt like I was on my own and only got interviews that I personally tried to get. In the end for me it mattered the most going through a friend to get a job as no one else trusted/believed in a bootcamp grad.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 19th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    Its emphasis on experiential learning, the individual attention I received throughout the entire course, the quality of the curriculum, and the culture of learning and collaboration.

    Answered by graduate Liza L on September 19th, 2016

  • Hack Reactor Hack Reactor Core review

    I saved up, quit my decent job, got the training needed to get a better job and now I'm making twice as much. I put in the work and they delivered as promised. Great experience.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 19th, 2016

Talk with Hack Reactor graduates

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Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

How would you describe the culture at Hack Reactor?

Posted by Thinkful on September 12th, 2016

Answer

Fully supportive but never coddling. If you expect to have anything done for you, including the job search afterwards, this isn't the program for you. Support is there 100%, but it's more like coaching from mentors. One of the primary criticisms is that you have to figure so much out on your own, in spite of paying $18k for the program. What they're really teaching you is to be able to figure out the solution to any problem, in spite of a total lack of documentation, ambiguous requirements, a language you've never written in, it doesn't matter. Utter self-reliance. That's the kind of engineer you want to become.

Answered by graduate Neil M on September 12th, 2016

Instructors are recent HackReactor graduates. They can help with coursework , and know very little outside of curriculum. Its was a remote bootcamp with 9 other co-workers. Most of them were seasoned C++ developers with around 10-15 years of experience.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 13th, 2016

Professional

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 13th, 2016

Hard working, accommodating, supportive, encouraging

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 13th, 2016

Overwhelmingly, it is encouraging and one of a growth mindset where challenges are faced head on

Answered by graduate Leslie Pajuelo on September 13th, 2016

The culture at Hack Reactor was very much focused on the transformative experience of gearing up to become a software engineer. While there was time for fun and games the curriculum itself was well curated and the tempo was intense.

Answered by graduate Sean Grogg on September 14th, 2016

You had to be positive to make it through the course! The culture is what made Hack Reactor as amazing as it was

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

I was impressed at how intelligent yet humble and friendly all my classmates were. The culture was nothing like any education experience I've had before because there was so much enthusiasm for the work and desire to explore.

Answered by graduate Casey Woolley on September 18th, 2016

Fast, high-tech, open to ideas and innovation. Student-centered learning (not teacher centered).

Answered by graduate Abdul T on September 19th, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Thinkful on September 12th, 2016

Answer

Instructors were great, and I felt like the information presented in the curriculum was the cream of the crop; decades of collective engineering experience distilled into the highest-leverage topics. Rather than give you the answer, they guide you through your particular bug/issue socratically. Worth $18k? I thought so. Sure I could have learned the same info on my own, but I'm positive I never would have learned so much, so quickly.

Answered by graduate Neil M on September 12th, 2016

They are helpful with the content. Anything advanced and new JS technology, they don't know much about it.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 13th, 2016

I had great shepherds who helped in many ways.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 13th, 2016

They were willing to chat individually when I needed more instruction

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 13th, 2016

For Remote the classes are videos and there is time, between 1-1.5 hours of a townhall to ask questions of tech mentors. They were helpful for the most part. Though when I was there only one had industry experience so it was difficult to ask higher level questions.

Answered by graduate Leslie Pajuelo on September 13th, 2016

My instructors were really great at what they did: they were technically capable, spoke from engineering experience at companies I recognized, and assessed my strengths and weaknesses in a no-nonsense fashion.

Answered by graduate Sean Grogg on September 14th, 2016

They were awesome at answering questions and gave amazing lectures! I think a difference with Hack Reactor is they give you some responsibility on how to manage time and what you should be learning currently.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

They were most helpful in their curriculum and classroom format. Instruction was very clear and very little handholding was needed. And sometimes preferred because it forced us to become more resourceful. I would say though there were times when I did wish that the TA's could have helped out more when we were stuck. But sometimes they just didn't know how to help us. It's good to learn how to deal with being stuck though.

Answered by graduate Casey Woolley on September 18th, 2016

Pretty effective.

Answered by graduate Abdul T on September 19th, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Thinkful on September 12th, 2016

Answer

You get out of it what you put in. Throw yourself in 100%. Also, when you start freaking out, just chill. You're going to be fine.

Answered by graduate Neil M on September 12th, 2016

Bootcamps are not an alternative for university degrees. Its an add-ons course.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 13th, 2016

Enjoy yourself

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 13th, 2016

Do your research before committing to a bootcamp (or even choosing to do the bootcamp route). Depending on what you're looking for, one bootcamp may be a better fit for you than another. Don't just listen blindly to online reviews and general reputation.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 13th, 2016

Take care of yourself. Have systems in place, maid/family/food delivery, to lessen the physical impact. It's an intense program. Remote costs nearly 18K, spend the 1k more to have support over the 3 months.

Answered by graduate Leslie Pajuelo on September 13th, 2016

Have the right reasons for joining - otherwise you won't be adequately prepared for the transformative experience.

Answered by graduate Sean Grogg on September 14th, 2016

Be ready to work hard! A good base in Git will make your life much easier, and any knowledge of developing full-stack applications will put you ahead of most people

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

Just come to class with a good attitude every day. Things are going to come at you faster than you can handle it and that's by design. Just enjoy it and have fun with classmates. You'll survive and you'll be pleasantly surprised at how much you've learned by the end.

Answered by graduate Casey Woolley on September 18th, 2016

Prepare, prepare prepare, a lot of info will be thrown at you and you will need to be able to grasp and understand that information quickly. I spent a year playing around with node.js/javascript which did help me out during Hack Reactor.

Answered by graduate Abdul T on September 19th, 2016

How would you describe the culture at Hack Reactor?

Posted by Anonymous on July 27th, 2016

Answer

Students: Smart, Friendly, Capable, Curious, Mostly Younger (recent college graduates and career changers) | Staff: Dedicated, Caring, Responsive, Available, Sarcastic

Answered by graduate Chris Saden on July 27th, 2016

Amazingly energetic. Everyone is incredibly excited to learn, including the instructors. Your cohort mates come from a huge variety of backgrounds but you will all share a common goal of becoming amazing engineers.

Answered by graduate Elliot Plant on July 27th, 2016

Everyone that is there you can tell wants to learn and help each other grow. Everyone was also extremely nice and welcoming so it made moving to a new state easier.

Answered by graduate Dakota p on August 5th, 2016

The culture is largely strong, welcoming and considerate, although each cohort defines its own culture and unfortunately there were some individuals in my cohort who managed to drag down the overall experience for me and some of the people I worked with. Hack Reactor does stress professionalism and tolerance but it is difficult to enforce so I found it was important to give feedback whenever something bothered me.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 9th, 2016

It is intense and tough but the staff are great at checking in with you. They only want you to succeed. It is very much a work hard, play hard sort of culture. Its very similar to that of a well funded startup. You end up with very strong friendships that will last a lifetime.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 9th, 2016

It felt very competitive, for better or worse. As a woman or underrepresented minority in tech you may feel more intimidated, which sucks. At the end of the day, though, everyone in my cohort was close friends who supported each other pretty well.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 9th, 2016

Everyone was extremely committed to the program, but there was a still a very fun-loving atmosphere that allowed things to not get too stressful. I made a lot of good friends that I still keep in touch with.

Answered by graduate Medhir B on September 12th, 2016

Very supportive and oriented around self-improvement in all areas from, staying physically in shape to becoming a skillful software engineer.

Answered by graduate John P on September 12th, 2016

You come out of HR loving the people you're surrounded by. You went through the trenches together and it instantly bonds you to anyone has gone through it.

Answered by graduate Danielle B on September 13th, 2016

Very supportive and close-knit.

Answered by graduate Tai H on September 13th, 2016

Focused on a growth mindset. Everyone is helpful and there's an electricity in the room as soon as you enter

Answered by graduate Sean R on September 14th, 2016

Everyone, from the instructors to the support staff to the students, is very supportive of each other.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

Everyone was striving to learn and mentor others. It was a culture of curiosity and drive. Everyone was very friendly.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

Open, inviting, friendly, passionate.

Answered by graduate Kurt Weiberth on September 18th, 2016

Awesome! Both with the staff and students.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 18th, 2016

intense work culture - 6 days a week for 12 hours a day. People are like a big family during the program (and in ways after).

Answered by graduate Christopher Pruijsen on September 18th, 2016

Great. People were helpful and enthusiastic.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

The culture is one that encourages every person to work extremely hard, but not at the cost of each other's success. It is simultaneously collaborative and intense.

Answered by graduate Liza L on September 19th, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Anonymous on July 27th, 2016

Answer

The instruction is consistent and predictable in the first six weeks of the program. There is structure in projects in the second six weeks, but most of the learning that you do is self-driven, which is part of the program's design. Large lecture format was used most often in the town halls to introduce new topics; lecture actually occurs throughout the entire program. The instructors used wait time effectively to get students to think. The instructors also gauged the level of understanding in the room by asking students to put their thumbs up, sideways, or down. The instructor would pass around a microphone so students could ask questions. Questions were often put back on the students and then the instructor would clarify. Most of a student's time is spent outside of lecture, reading websites, writing code, and debugging errors. The help desk, which is staffed by recent Hack Reactor graduates, takes questions from students as students work on 2 days sprints and larger projects. I didn't find the Help Desk to be a helpful service. Weekly assessments occur in the first six weeks, and the technical mentors who review them are strong and point out parts of your assessment that need improvement. The technical mentors will not provide feedback on the assessment if you are doing well (which is by design), but I believe this is a detriment to anyone learning something new. The instructional team consistently reflects on the curriculum and how students are doing each week in the program so I'm confident HackReactor has continued to improve their instructional strategies, the level of rigor, and the breadth and depth of various topics to this day.

Answered by graduate Chris Saden on July 27th, 2016

Extremely effective. They all have backgrounds in teaching and industry, so they know what real problems are and they know how to best teach you how to solve them.

Answered by graduate Elliot Plant on July 27th, 2016

Instructors were excellent. They challenge you and help you to learn how to troubleshoot the issue you have. We had one guest instructor who was a little too fast in the way that he covered things and as a group we gave feedback to raise our concerns.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 9th, 2016

The instructors were great. They really know what they are talking about and are effective at present the information in a way that you can digest it. They only give you enough information for you to try tackling the problem yourself. Again the point of the program is to teach you how to learn and be self sufficient in the working environment.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 9th, 2016

The instructors were great. Looking back now, though, the tech mentors who help out with projects and sprints generally do not have any industry experience -- they've only gone through HR. They probably know enough to be doing what they do, but I would also NOT feel bad if you're singled out as someone who needs help. The staff seemed to pick people at the very beginning who were targeted as being behind, and instead of helping the students do better I think the staff put unnecessary stress on them while also making their imposter syndrome way worse.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 9th, 2016

The instructors were a bit of a mix. The main lecturers had a good handle on programming in JavaScript, though the one with a more traditional CS/industry background did a much more thorough and nuanced job than the one who was a Hack Reactor grad. Many of the teaching assistants are Hack Reactor grads as well. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, but considering the amount of growth the program has had in the past year makes me think that more of the key staff likely has only had software experience from a bootcamp. Aside from instructors, the core curriculum is very well done and is extremely helpful in its own right. I wish I still had access to those slide decks!

Answered by graduate Medhir B on September 12th, 2016

The lecturers are very knowledgeable. The helpers, "help" you figure out the answer, even if they don't know it themselves, which is a common occurrence in engineering.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 12th, 2016

In 9/10 cases the instructors were incredible. Able to answer any question you asked no matter how low-level(how are HTTP request converted into TCP packets?) or how high-level(How can you scale your database separate from your REST API for the best performance?)

Answered by graduate John P on September 12th, 2016

They were very effective in providing the outline, the guidelines for us to follow. As in, providing us enough information for us to get started, and then leaving the rest of it for us to struggle with and struggle hard, until it becomes truly counter productive if we're stuck for a long period of time (for me it was around 30-45 minutes).

Answered by graduate Tai H on September 13th, 2016

When I left I felt I had the skills to tackle whatever was thrown at me.

Answered by graduate Danielle B on September 13th, 2016

Very effective

Answered by graduate Sean R on September 14th, 2016

I wouldn't say that any instructors were useless. Some were better than others, but that is always the case when it comes to teaching. Overall, I thought all of the instructors were great and were always striving to improve if they got feedback about what may have not been clear.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

Instructors were top notch. I learned from them but I also learned just as much from my peers. At Hack Reactor, you are both student and teacher on any given day.

Answered by graduate Kurt Weiberth on September 18th, 2016

Extremely effective. They give you just enough to start off but do not spoon feed you. This makes you a better autonomous engineer.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 18th, 2016

Instructors are helpful in showing a direction. You still have to do the hard work yourself.

Answered by graduate Christopher Pruijsen on September 18th, 2016

The lectures were pretty useless for me. I don't know why but I feel like they were too fast paced and I was always worried or pre-occupied (thought-wise) with the sprint material. I think lectures for software engineering are not useful. Actual coding and doing examples at ones own pace or with a pair are much more fruitful.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Their manner on calling on people ensured that we all paid attention and came to class as prepared as we could. I found the regular lectures and solution lectures among the best I've had.

Answered by graduate Liza L on September 19th, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Anonymous on July 27th, 2016

Answer

Be ready to give up your life and learn as much as you can while at HackReactor. There is so much to learn about software engineering, and you have to learn a lot to be capable of contributing to a new company on day 1 of your new found engineering job. The program will be tough at times and it will be even harder to land a job. You need to work extremely hard while at the program and work harder after the program to start your new career. There will be plenty of days of frustration while at HackReactor, and there will be days of doubts (even after the program), when you wonder "Am I good enough to be Software Engineer?". The answer is "YES!", and you need to focus on learning, asking questions, and building new projects to gain experience. Never stop learning.

Answered by graduate Chris Saden on July 27th, 2016

A positive attitude will help you learn better than anything else. If you're always smiling and friendly, you'll find that you like yourself better when you run into tough challenges and you'll notice later on that people will really want you on their teams. This will help a lot when you're looking to find a job.

Answered by graduate Elliot Plant on July 27th, 2016

Try to be as comfortable in JavaScript as possible before you start. Having a good grasp of the basics will make it far easier to understand the more complex concepts. Be supportive of the other people in your class as not everyone will understand the same things in the same way. Be an aggressive, but respectful pair-programmer so that you get experience in writing code, but also supporting someone else in their journey too.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 9th, 2016

Learn to pace yourself and relax every once in a while. Be sure to try to solve the problem yourself by looking online for some guidance. You aren't doing yourself any favors by asking for help all the time. Also, be friendly and helpful to your peers as they will be your network in the future.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 9th, 2016

You get as much out of it as you put into it. Make sure to sleep and take care of yourself during the program -- it can be really stressful.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 9th, 2016

The really hard work begins after you graduate, having to prove yourself as a software engineer in a very competitive landscape. Don't take the cost of hack reactor (both in time and monetarily) lightly. Like any other bootcamp, Hack Reactor isn't a silver bullet that's going to provide shortcuts to getting a good job in the industry. Also, look around at other bootcamps before committing to one. Nowadays there's many different options and if you're not exclusively interested in developing software (e.g. if you want to do UX design, Product Management, etc.) there may be better alternatives.

Answered by graduate Medhir B on September 12th, 2016

Stay late. Work hard. Practice communication skills.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 12th, 2016

If you are going to this this make sure you are passionate about getting every thing you can out of it. You would be doing the other students a dis-service by not having a good attitude. Also don't fret what you don't know, you're all there to learn and you all were in fact accepted and are intelligent individuals.

Answered by graduate John P on September 12th, 2016

Get to know everyone, don't fuck around, stay later, practice writing good code, and study hard within the 3 months to maximize the sacrifices you had to make. However, if it's late and you've hit the wall, GO HOME, wind down with a glass of wine, shower, and then go to sleep. You do not want to go to sleep fatigued and frustrated, because you're going to wake up fatigued and frustrated.

Answered by graduate Tai H on September 13th, 2016

The entire time you're going to believe you can't do it, but don't give up. You will make it through it and it's totally worth it.

Answered by graduate Danielle B on September 13th, 2016

Make sure to mentally prepare yourself. This is a marathon not a sprint.

Answered by graduate Sean R on September 14th, 2016

Focus on the fundamentals. You can't learn everything in three months, or even three years. You will inevitably feel like you're falling behind because this person will be using this framework and that person will be using that library or build tool, and you think you have to know everything. You don't. Your grasp of JS fundamentals will be the biggest factor in finding a job after the program.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

If you are ever confused, don't be afraid to ask questions. That, in itself, is a very useful skill to have and to keep throughout your career. It will help you learn more and give you the ability to do so in the workplace where there will always be questions that need to be asked.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

Be prepared to work hard, but don't be scared of it. Everyone is in the same position and as a class you will all make it :)

Answered by graduate Kurt Weiberth on September 18th, 2016

Be prepared to give your 200% have a open mind and trust the pedagogy. Ultimately it's up to you to maximize your learning at HackReactor.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 18th, 2016

Make the most of it, explore new technologies.

Answered by graduate Christopher Pruijsen on September 18th, 2016

More prep material would be great. I think the pre-coursework needs to be more in depth and should aim to solidify a students conception of fundamental javascript. I remember still strugling with "this" and recursion towards towards the beggining of class.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

The pre-course work is your best means of starting off strong. Especially if you come from a non-technical background, do not skimp on the work, and try and do as much as the extra /recommended work and reading as you can. Once you start, it is much harder to set aside more study time for subjects.

Answered by graduate Liza L on September 19th, 2016

Make sure this is something you want to do. Put in the work and reap the rewards. You just have to want it.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

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