The Iron Yard Reviews

4.1 / 5

Atlanta, Austin, Charleston, Charlotte, Columbia, Durham, Greenville, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Little Rock, Nashville, Salt Lake City, Washington DC, Minneapolis, London

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The Iron Yard is one of the world’s largest and fastest-growing code schools. It exists to create real, lasting change for people, companies and communities through technology education. It offers full-time and part-time programs in Back-End Engineering, Data Science, Design, Front-End Engineering and Mobile Engineering (see full course listing below). The Iron Yard has 20 campuses across the U.S.

The Iron Yard launched its first code school campus in Greenville, S.C. in 2013 with two employees and one course offering. In just over two years, the organization has grown into ten course offerings and more than 100 full-time employees.

We work with employers of all sizes in each market where a campus is located. Our comprehensive career support program helps match trained graduates with those employers. We often build our programs and courses for specific locations around employer needs in that specific area.

Claim one of several scholarships to The Iron Yard by applying through the links below:

C# .NET REST Testing SQL Python HTML JavaScript NumPy matplotlib Data Science CSS MVC React Node Java Clojure PostgreSQL iOS Objective-C Cocoa Django Ruby on Rails Wireframing Typography UI

[email protected]
http://theironyard.com/

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The Iron Yard programs

Programs Cities Duration Cost
Program: User Interface Design Cities: Austin, Columbia Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $13,900
People interested in making websites look good and function well are ideal candidates for The Iron Yard’s user interface design bootcamp. Students will not only learn plenty of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript skills, but also will learn the fundamentals of typography, layout, and color theory. Graduates of The Iron Yard’s design bootcamp will also have some skills in Photoshop and Illustrator.
Program: Rails Engineering Cities: Atlanta, Austin, Charleston, Charlotte, Columbia, Durham, Greenville, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Little Rock, Nashville, Salt Lake City, Washington DC Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $13,900
Over the course of three months, a heavy-duty programming veteran (and skilled mentor) will show you the power of Ruby on Rails, one of the most popular server-side frameworks in the world. At the end of class you’ll know how to build rock-solid servers, manage databases and know the basics of front end app development. The best part: we’ll help you get a job offer when you graduate (or your tuition back, guaranteed). Don’t know any code? Don’t worry. Our proven teachers and process will take you from zero to hero and mentor you into a professional junior-level programmer.
Program: Python and Django Cities: Atlanta, Austin, Charleston, Charlotte, Columbia, Durham, Greenville, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Little Rock, Nashville, Salt Lake City, Washington DC Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $13,900
Future programmers can enroll in The Iron Yard’s back-end engineering with Python and Django bootcamp. The curriculum focuses on building back-end systems, and reminds students that the back-ends of many high-profile websites (i.e. Instagram, Pinterest, and YouTube) are run via Python. During and after the program, The Iron Yard students and graduates have extensive access to career-related services such as one-on-one career coaching.
Program: Mobile Engineering Cities: Charlotte, Houston, Indianapolis, Nashville, Salt Lake City, Washington DC, London Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $13,900
The Iron Yard’s mobile engineering bootcamp curriculum focuses on Objective-C, C, and Swift. Graduates will have the skills necessary to not only build apps for mobile Apple devices, but also Mac OS X computers. Guest speakers, company tours, and extensive career services are all part of The Iron Yard’s bootcamp experience.
Program: Java and Clojure Cities: Atlanta, Austin, Charleston, Charlotte, Columbia, Durham, Greenville, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Little Rock, Nashville, Salt Lake City, Washington DC Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $13,900
During The Iron Yard’s back-end engineering with Java and Clojure bootcamp, students will learn the art and science of building great server-side apps. The curriculum includes object-oriented programming, how to successfully store data, functional programming, and managing personal and team workflow. The Iron Yard’s back-end engineering with Java and Clojure bootcamp includes field trips, guest speakers, mock interviews, and one-on-one career coaching.
Program: Front-End Engineering Cities: Atlanta, Austin, Charleston, Charlotte, Columbia, Durham, Greenville, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Little Rock, Minneapolis, Nashville, Salt Lake City, Washington DC, London Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $13,900
The Iron Yard’s front-end engineering bootcamp is designed for people who want to learn how to build web apps with JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. The bootcamp curriculum includes extensive career preparation services – including advice from seasoned freelance programmers. The Iron Yard offers a free online “crash course” for those contemplating whether they want to enlist in a bootcamp.
Program: Data Science Cities: Durham Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $13,900
The Iron Yard’s data science bootcamp focuses on back-end programming in the Python framework. The data science curriculum also covers skills in presenting data and using Git and Github to manage personal and team workflows. The Iron Yard offers plenty of career preparation services and field trips, geared both toward potential freelancers and those students who wish to find a more traditional job within one company.
Program: C and #NET Cities: Atlanta, Austin, Charleston, Charlotte, Columbia, Durham, Greenville, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Little Rock, Nashville, Salt Lake City, Washington DC Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $13,900
The Iron Yard’s back-end engineering with C# and .NET bootcamp empowers students to build websites and apps that function similar to Amazon, Facebook, and Twitter. The curriculum includes programming fundamentals such as data modeling, as well as front-end tools. Mock interviews, resume writing, on-site tours with development teams, and guest speakers are also part of The Iron Yard bootcamp experience.

The Iron Yard reviews

13 reviews

Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

  • The Iron Yard Mobile Engineering review

    My experience at The Iron Yard was great. It was a lot of hard work but there was always someone there to help. The culture was great and all instructors were easy to get along with.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 3rd, 2016

  • The Iron Yard Rails Engineering review

    Iron Yard is for people that already have experience in some type of programming. I'm sure TIY will most definitely elevate someone's career who's somewhat versed in the field. I attended a course in Python long enough to see the students that had previous experience excel in the heavy work load. While the others(half the class) including myself, get lost in the curriculum. I had absolutely no experience in programming and was totally lost. I still feel like they took my money even though I told them I was concerned that the curriculum was over my head. Overall, I can't give them a horrible review because I believe they have a lot to offer someone looking to further their education in programming. However, I did feel like they took advantage of naivety(I'm still paying them).

    Answered by Anonymous on August 3rd, 2016

  • The Iron Yard Rails Engineering review

    It is a great company and an amazing program to attend. It has completely changed my life for the better, and introduced me into a field that I can build a career in. It is a company that brings a group of like-minded people together and teaches them the skills they need to succeed as a computer programmer. Attending The Iron Yard was the best decision I have made in my entire life.

    Answered by graduate Adam Kelsey on August 5th, 2016

  • The Iron Yard Rails Engineering review

    What an incredible experience! I can't say enough great things about The Iron Yard and their staff. I love them, they're amazing! Completing The Iron Yard was one of the most challenging things I've done. I thought about quitting a number of times because the curriculum was incredibly rigorous and deep, but every step of the way their staff was there to make sure that I had the tools, instruction, support and encouragement to succeed. But what blows my mind even more, is that that instruction, commitment, encouragement and support has continued post graduation - in fact I'm having drinks with my former instructor in a couple of days just to catch up and get some advice. I graduated over a year ago! If you have the chance to learn at The Iron Yard, take it! You'll get every bit of what you put in and more. Feel free to email me or call me personally if you want to hear it from the "horses mouth" as they say. Happy to take a few moments to help the next person have the same incredible experience I did. Randy Mitchell [email protected] 404-721-3325

    Answered by graduate Randy Mitchell on August 8th, 2016

  • The Iron Yard Front End Engineering review

    Positive- I wish it could've been a little longer, really. I felt like I left with a good foundation of JS that I was able to add to on my own. I was well prepared for my first job. It truly is a crash course, though- it's fast, and you aren't going to learn everything.

    Answered by graduate Luke G on August 4th, 2016

  • The Iron Yard Unspecified review

    Fantastic experience. The skills you acquire and the people you meet will be assets whatever your goals are. I am still involved and help grow others and grow myself through those I meet.

    Answered by graduate Jordan Smith on August 15th, 2016

  • The Iron Yard Unspecified review

    Attending the Iron Yard was one of the best decisions I ever made. It motivated me to learn, the teachers and my fellow peers in class were all amazing to learn with. TIY made me realize how much I enjoyed coding, and I have learned so much in the past several months, and am continuing to learn each day. I found a job 10 days after the Iron Yard. It definitely helped me get my foot in the door, gave me the confidence I needed to find a job in the industry, and gave me a strong knowledge base of front end development. I believe that it has a great return on investment.

    Answered by graduate Lauren Farr on August 15th, 2016

  • The Iron Yard Unspecified review

    The Iron Yard gave me an opportunity to change careers with credibility that enabled me to find my current dream job. My work is particularly rewarding because I am in a situation where I am given the license to learn and implement new tech in our stack. This has given me opportunities to expand my knowledge and feel like I am contributing to the overall product direction.

    Answered by graduate Jeff S on August 15th, 2016

  • The Iron Yard Unspecified review

    TIY is a great opportunity for those who are serious and passionate about becoming professional programmers. The staff are great people and as a company they did their best to equip me with the skills and tools I needed to succeed.

    Answered by graduate Drew Botka on August 15th, 2016

  • The Iron Yard Unspecified review

    I absolutely loved my experience at The Iron Yard. The curriculum, in my experience, goes into more depth than other programs I've seen. I gained invaluable experience from our final project and Demo Day. The community is also tight-knit and super helpful! I still keep in touch with my classmates, as well as alumns from other cohorts.

    Answered by graduate Cecy C on August 15th, 2016

  • The Iron Yard Unspecified review

    Overpriced, full of promises but little follow through, only good if you have a good base for coding before you start, will pass anyone no matter how far behind they fall. They spend a lot of time holding back class for people that don't do well. Projects are barely looked at after completion by the instructors. It's a high-priced joke.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 15th, 2016

  • The Iron Yard Unspecified review

    Great experience, great instructors and supportive community. They are dedicated to their students and focused on teaching you what you need to be a great developer long term.

    Answered by graduate Astrid C on August 15th, 2016

  • The Iron Yard Unspecified review

    The Iron Yard goes above and beyond in nurturing a great learning environment. The instructors are very patient and helpful and there is a sense of community between all of the students.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 16th, 2016

Talk with The Iron Yard graduates

Ask your question

Bootcamp grads love to talk. We'll find students from The Iron Yard to answer your questions.

Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

I am pretty much set on The Iron Yard in November but am a little concerned from all the "not for someone without coding experience" comments I have seen in the reviews. I don't have experience in programming. Is there anything I can do to prepare for the camp in addition to the free schools like Code Academy? Thanks

Posted by Joe on October 16th, 2016

Answer
How would you describe the culture at The Iron Yard?

Posted by Anonymous on August 3rd, 2016

Answer

It was a melting pot of culture. Everyone seemed to mesh very well after the first few weeks. I never felt out of place or that I didn't belong.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 3rd, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Anonymous on August 3rd, 2016

Answer

Very effective instructors. Any time I asked for help or guidance, I was given what I needed. They were all very nice. Seeing how passionate they were about coding made it motivating

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 3rd, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Anonymous on August 3rd, 2016

Answer

Expect to work hard. You won't learn to code through osmosis. Take breaks and don't beat yourself up if you don't catch on right away. Work with other students. Create your Git repos right away and keep on committing!

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 3rd, 2016

How would you describe the culture at The Iron Yard?

Posted by Anonymous on August 3rd, 2016

Answer

Positive. The 'campus' is submersive and healthy for the various curriculum. though the courses were deep and intense, they did a great job of breaking the stress up with other activities

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 3rd, 2016

Having recently graduated from High School and attended College, it was very adult. In college, it felt like overpaid babysitting but The Iron Yard treated me like an adult and it had a very relaxed atmosphere. Everyone who is there wants to be there to better themselves, and everyone is willing to help each other out, especially The Iron Yard staff. The culture is a bunch of intelligent, personable people all in the same place.

Answered by graduate Adam Kelsey on August 5th, 2016

Beautiful! It's a culture of passion for people and technology, in that order. Everyone on the team is incredibly encouraging and supportive.

Answered by graduate Randy Mitchell on August 8th, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Anonymous on August 3rd, 2016

Answer

Very. Again, I Was failing the course of study but could see the others excel in class. The instructor as the experience and the ability to teach the course a rapid pace

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 3rd, 2016

Very effective. I wasn't just taught Ruby on Rails, Javascript, and the basics of programming. I was taught how to learn and be proactive. It is a very fast paced environment, and a lot of the learning is on you to take what you get, and go a step further with it. The instructors were incredible at teaching you what you need to know, but in a way that you learn it yourself instead of them spoon feeding it to you.

Answered by graduate Adam Kelsey on August 5th, 2016

I'm convinced that none can do it better. My instructor Brit Butler, aka Shidoshi (name for Ninjutsu instructors) was(is) exceptional! He's not just a teacher, he's an experience :-) Brit's a code archaeologist. He digs deep and teaches beyond the syntax: - why software exists as it does today. - the thoughts & perspectives of those who created and iterated on it. - and the impact that its had on modern software today. He taught us the how and the why - the principles and philosophies behind creating great software.

Answered by graduate Randy Mitchell on August 8th, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Anonymous on August 3rd, 2016

Answer

The Iron Yard is not for those who have no experience in programming. Although a councilor may say otherwise. However, if the new student is looking to add this bootcamp to their already versed resume, I think they should enroll. The curriculum is very intense and the work load is heavy. You most likely need 60-80hrs of dedication to TIY every week

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 3rd, 2016

Do not be afraid to fail, and do not be afraid to ask questions. Work on something yourself for 15 to 20 minutes and if you can't figure it out, ask! Pounding your head against the wall doesn't do you or anyone else any good. My instructor once told me the difference between me and him is that he has had more experience failing at programming. It is simply how you learn. Don't be intimidated that they figure things out very fast or just know what they are doing. They have had a lot of time to get to that point. Failing is acceptable, and highly encouraged. You learn more by messing up and then getting it right, than you do by always having the answer.

Answered by graduate Adam Kelsey on August 5th, 2016

Don't give up. Most of us felt like quitting, MORE than once! Some during the course and some even after graduation. Stay the course, it gets easier with time and practice. Keep at it, and don't give up. Did I say DON'T GIVE UP!!! If you're thinking about quitting and giving up...wait for it => DON'T DO IT! ;-)

Answered by graduate Randy Mitchell on August 8th, 2016

How would you describe the culture at The Iron Yard?

Posted by Anonymous on August 4th, 2016

Answer

Encouraging, fast-moving. They never hesitate to help you when you're stuck, but you are also expected to put in work on your own (which is a really really really good idea, by the way).

Answered by graduate Luke G on August 4th, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Anonymous on August 4th, 2016

Answer

Very good. They were both highly knowledgeable about all things programming, and were always happy to share. They would stay late any day to make sure you 'got it'

Answered by graduate Luke G on August 4th, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Anonymous on August 4th, 2016

Answer

Put in work. A lot of it. Ask for help often. You will be glad you did once you enter the job market. Never skip a concept that looks like magic- there is no magic. It is CRITICAL that you understand core programming concepts before you go out to interviews.

Answered by graduate Luke G on August 4th, 2016

How would you describe the culture at The Iron Yard?

Posted by Anonymous on August 15th, 2016

Answer

Inviting, challenging and fun. You are learning skills that are not easy to master and it can be fruatrating, but the students and staff there help and encourage you to accomplish things you would never be able to on your own.

Answered by graduate Jordan Smith on August 15th, 2016

TIY had a very relaxed and positive culture. Everyone was willing to help and no one was afraid to ask questions. There was no such thing as a stupid question.

Answered by graduate Lauren Farr on August 15th, 2016

The IY is very much an environment where you are challenged to go beyond your capabilities of what you thought you knew and break thru to new levels of knowledge.

Answered by graduate Jeff S on August 15th, 2016

Very cool and down-to-earth. I think they take a very pragmatic approach to prepping their students and in doing so they make it a point to interact with you in a way that might be similar to that of a professional working environment; soft-skills, downtime and all. They work hard and enjoy the fruits of labor.

Answered by graduate Drew Botka on August 15th, 2016

I felt the culture was very friendly and open. Alumns tend to stick around and that is a huge testament to how much we enjoyed our time there.

Answered by graduate Cecy C on August 15th, 2016

The culture is fun and stressful but they try hard to keep you in the program - mainly because if you drop out they lose money. The teachers are well meaning.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

Very open and friendly. There is a casual atmosphere that encourages asking questions and working together. I often spent time learning from my classmates and still maintain friendships with them.

Answered by graduate Astrid C on August 15th, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Anonymous on August 15th, 2016

Answer

Jesse and Bryan continually went out of there way to help the students make progress and get hired or accomplish their stated goals. They are friends and great humans.

Answered by graduate Jordan Smith on August 15th, 2016

My instructors were very effective teachers. I am a visual learner and they were very good at satisfying that method. They were overly helpful and very approachable.

Answered by graduate Lauren Farr on August 15th, 2016

I learned allot with my instructor..She was very encouraging in private sessions where I was having trouble with my progress. I always felt behind because of the volume of information, but there was a balance with maintaining a pace so that we could get allot of exposure to the full stack.

Answered by graduate Jeff S on August 15th, 2016

Very effective. The curriculum and knowledge base were all geared to push each student to the limit of their abilities. I think if I had been even better prepared for my class I still would have been challenged just as much every day.

Answered by graduate Drew Botka on August 15th, 2016

My instructor was amazingly knowledgeable. I feel lucky I had access to such a knowledgable developer who was always able to answer any question I had.

Answered by graduate Cecy C on August 15th, 2016

I had a great instructor but no matter how great an instructor is, it's practically impossible to teach people that have very little experience to code in 12 weeks.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

Very effective. I found that I could freelance immediately after completing the program and that my skills were relevant at my first full time developer job.

Answered by graduate Astrid C on August 15th, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Anonymous on August 15th, 2016

Answer

You get out what you put into it so make sure you push through the rough nights, ask for help quickly and often, and remember there is a classroom full of people going through the same things you are.

Answered by graduate Jordan Smith on August 15th, 2016

DO IT. Make sure you are aware that every day will be extremely busy and you legitimately won't have time for anything else but this is also what is so great about the course. You will be so excited to learn it wont even matter. The first week is very difficult to adjust but don't freak out. You will get through it and look back and laugh about how much you have learned since the beginning.

Answered by graduate Lauren Farr on August 15th, 2016

You cant double time this with a job, you will likely fail unless you already have substantial coding experience. I tell everyone who is interested that you cannot be 'doing' something else on the side and keep up with the information overload

Answered by graduate Jeff S on August 15th, 2016

Know what you're getting yourself into. Do your homework. Study on your own. Do the pre-requisites and take them seriously. Don't take the course if you're not prepared to teach yourself everyday throughout the course and for the rest of your career. Don't do it if you don't want to have to study often or don't want to be challenged beyond your skillset on a frequent basis. Listen to your instructors and put your ego on hold for the duration of the course. Absorb every ounce of knowledge and experience you can from everyone around you. That being said, enjoy it and have fun with it. You'll only get to experience this once.

Answered by graduate Drew Botka on August 15th, 2016

Visit the campus before you enroll! Most Iron Yard campuses will host free crash courses. Make sure you like the instructors as you will be spending 12 weeks learning with them :)

Answered by graduate Cecy C on August 15th, 2016

Take the same time off and use free resources or online resources and videos, practice things on your own, and avoid using bootcamps. You will never get a high paying job right out of school like they promise you - employers don't want bootcamp students. None of my class did. It's just more debt for a scam. There's a reason they can't offer a "guarantee". If it sounds too good to be true, it is.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

It's hard, do it anyway. Take every opportunity to grow and have fun. when speakers come talk ask them questions and be open minded about where this experience can take you.

Answered by graduate Astrid C on August 15th, 2016

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