Turing School of Software & Design Reviews

4.8 / 5

Denver

all bootcamps

Turing is not a bootcamp. It is a seven-month, full-time training program to turn driven students into professional developers. Turing is the brainchild of Jeff Casimir and Jumpstart Lab (you might recognize these names from Hungry Academy and gSchool, among other achievements). Students participate in the program full time with 40 hours a week of class and lab time and an additional 20-30 hours a week spent on homework. The program is divided into four six week modules with an intermission week between each module in order to allow students to absorb and process the knowledge they gain during the course of each module.

The staff at Turing emphasizes their educational experience, not just their years as developers, and promises that successful graduates of the school will be valuable contributors to the company they choose to work for. The Turing curriculum is deep and grounded in solid pedagogy. The instructors are all experienced classroom teachers who care about the future of their students.

The application process is rolling, and requires a resume, writing sample, video response, and logic challenge. Students in the Turing program will learn TDD with Ruby, Ruby Web Applications with Sinatra & Rails, Professional Web Applications, and High-Performance Applications with APIs and Services.

JavaScript React Ember.js HTML CSS Ruby on Rails Testing Sinatra

[email protected]
http://turing.io/

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Turing School of Software & Design programs

Programs Cities Duration Cost
Program: Web Application Development Cities: Denver Duration: 28 weeks Cost: $17,500
Turing School of Software & Design’s seven-month web app development bootcamp begins with training in object oriented program and web applications in Ruby. Other topics covered in the curriculum include client-side development in JavaScript and professional Rails applications. Turing School of Software & Design graduates, who are 35% women, land jobs at companies such as LivingSocial and Pivotal Labs.
Program: Front-end Development Cities: Denver Duration: 28 weeks Cost: $17,500
Over 28 weeks, the front-end development bootcamp at Turing School of Software & Design covers essential topics such as HTML and CSS fundamentals. Students will also gain hands-on experience in JavaScript testing, the jQuery DOM, Git workflow, and building desktop and mobile apps. Some of the companies that have hired Turing School of Software & Design graduates include the National Park Service and TableXI.

Turing School of Software & Design reviews

23 reviews

Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    The program is very intensive, requiring most of your time for 7 months. There are many things that they have in place that will prepare you for the workforce outside of the material itself as well, such as regular assessments that model technical interviews, a variety of projects including brown field projects.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 12th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    Turing is extraordinary in their commitment not only to building high class developers but also to helping already great people to grow. The program is 7 months of intense learning which is a highly effective approach that enables each student to establish a strong foundation that is more than suitable to propel the student into a successful, rewarding career.

    Answered by graduate Adam Caron on August 12th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    Turing is the most difficult, yet rewarding and worthwhile software development program out there. The community and connections are worth the price on their own.

    Answered by graduate Daniel G on August 12th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    Seriously do not spend your money at any other school. I have never felt more passionate about another organization than I do for Turing. I am two months into my first software position and my senior developers could not be more impressed with Turing's curriculum. Bottom line, if you want a career in tech and a lifelong community - apply to Turing.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 12th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    The hardest thing you may ever do, and well worth the effort. Have good familiarity going in, even if it's just tutorials. If you want a certificate that says you took a bootcamp, there are cheaper and much easier options. If you actually want to be a developer when you finish, then join Turing.

    Answered by graduate Dave Maurer on August 12th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    The 7 month program has a huge focus on rigor, analytical thinking and getting you a job. Many people don't make it through because it's challenging, but if you do, the opportunities are immense.

    Answered by graduate Marina C on August 12th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    I don't know much about other schools because I only attended Turing, but from what I know talking with other G school graduates and looking up the plethora of coding "bootcamps" before I attended, Turing is the best School to learn to code.

    Answered by graduate Zach R on August 12th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    For me it was a game changer. I went from a dead-end, $12/hour job that I hated to a school that completely engaged me for seven months. I had to work hard to keep up, but I did, and I think I did well. I felt both supported (if also overwhelmed) and challenged throughout the program. The staff and instructors are knowledgable about education as well as code. Towards the end they start nudging students to start with the job hunt, offering support in the form of resume guidance, interview prep, and access to the wide network of the staff, mentors, and alumni at Turing. After I graduated, I got two job offers, and accepted one that effectively more than tripled my income prior to Turing.

    Answered by graduate Viki H on August 15th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    I am very happy with my Turing School experience. Turing gave me the tools I needed to do what I love everyday and make a career of it. I have already recommended others to attend as well.

    Answered by graduate Drew R on August 15th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    What stands out about Turing School is its cultivation of camaraderie among its students and staff. At Turing, it's not just about learning languages. It's about learning how to learn; learning how to solve problems as a programmer; and learning how to give back.

    Answered by graduate Ling T on August 16th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    Without exaggeration, Turing was the most challenging 7 months of my life. But I learned an immense amount - enough to come straight into a position as a software developer and start writing production code immediately. The community is unparalleled and the teachers are top notch. Going to Turing was the best decision I have made to date.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 16th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    It's intense, but so so so worth it! Turing changed my life, it taught me how to learn and think programmatically. They spend a lot of time making sure you learn concepts rather than just memorizing syntaxes.

    Answered by graduate Paul Grever on August 16th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    Turing was extremely difficult, but also effective and rewarding beyond what I could have imagined. Post Turing, working a real job, I am impressed with the foundation it gave me. That being said, for someone with no prior tech experience it was pretty brutal. I would recommended that new students with no background in this field spend as much time as they can doing pre-work, tutorials, etc. before taking the plunge.

    Answered by graduate Penney Garrett on August 17th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    Not only are the instructors, for the most part, solid teachers, but it's also evident they care about each student. I was pushed to do more than I thought I could, I learned a lot, and I felt very supported by the strong community there.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 17th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    I had a great experience, I learned a ton, made some friends, and felt overall prepared for my first job in the field. It was a lot of long days, a lot of pressure, but it was worth it in the end.

    Answered by graduate Jeff Ruane on August 17th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    Turing is made up of teachers who really want to make you into a great developer. They want you to be prepared for the workforce, and they go out of their way to make sure you're ready for all aspects of the job. Community and inclusion are incredibly important to them.

    Answered by graduate Rose Kohn on August 17th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    I would rank Turing School extremely high in terms of quality and value. I felt very prepared for a junior level development position after graduating from Turing. In fact, after about 4 weeks of pairing with senior developers at a consultancy that was building our app I had enough experience and knowledge to be able to act as the only developer on our start ups team for about 6 weeks until we were able to hire our Director of Engineering.

    Answered by graduate Travis Haby on August 17th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    Excellent program. They do a great job of teaching you the skills needed to be successful in a software development career. From a financial perspective, you get the most bang for your buck with this program/bootcamp because of the length and the quality of instruction. It's also a great community with tons of previous and current students who are always willing to help and create an inclusive environment.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 17th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    It was one of the best experiences of my life, and definitely the best pedagogical experience I've ever had. It was challenging and incredibly fulfilling.

    Answered by graduate Kristina B on August 17th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    More than just an introduction to coding, this program will teach you how to thrive in a development career. It covers a wide variety of technologies and strives to open doors for anyone who wants to succeed as a developer.

    Answered by graduate Laura W on August 17th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    Turing School was a cost-efficient 7 month arduous program with solid teaching that gave me a large number of career options. I wouldn't have gotten a solid job and a solid education in programming and computer science otherwise.

    Answered by graduate Jeffrey Wan on August 17th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    A program with great academic rigor - it's very hard to move through the program without being proficient in the material. The school really cares about the sociological factors of the tech industry, with structured class-time devoted to discussing such issues. Job training and career placement need to improve. Turing seems to be miles behind other local powerhouse Galvanize, who is inherently keyed in with local tech (as an incubator), but also constantly hosts community events bringing in local industry leaders. Instructor quality is also in doubt, given how many recent students are now employed at the school (without industry experience), as well as some recent hires who lacked teaching experience/personalities. I worry that the school is growing faster (with the start of a front-end program) than it can retain its academic excellence.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 17th, 2016

  • Turing Web Application Development review

    Turing school has everything you want from any educational institution: great teachers, great curriculum, great community, great outcomes, and a nonprofit. It's been the best educational experience I've ever had, and I had gone through a multitude of different colleges before I went to Turing.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 17th, 2016

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How would you describe the culture at Turing?

Posted by Anonymous on August 12th, 2016

Answer

The culture while I was in Turing was very close knit. We were there to work hard. I still maintain many relationships that began in Turing. I have seen the network used as an effective tool to get jobs in the field. The culture has continued to grow and is now wide-ranging, including sports teams, happy hours, game nights, a women's group and many other events a groups.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 12th, 2016

Turing is full of kind, intelligent people who value personal growth and team mindset. In one word, the culture at Turing can be described as 'supportive'.

Answered by graduate Adam Caron on August 12th, 2016

Competitive and hardworking. Everyone attending wants to be there. Instructors and peers are overwhelmingly helpful and supportive. It's a crazy 7 months and it becomes your life, but it's well worth it.

Answered by graduate Daniel G on August 12th, 2016

Turing's greatest strength is the inclusive culture that it cultivates. You can go to any other coding school to learn how to program. Turing not only teaches, but is constantly trying to push for people to be.... well, better people!

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 12th, 2016

Inclusive, intense, close, supportive. The director made it a non-profit for a reason, and every single instructor is hand picked. Everyone at Turing cares about teaching the craft more than they do about making a paycheck. Go through the program and you will get it. It really is a different experience.

Answered by graduate Dave Maurer on August 12th, 2016

It's a non-profit, which speaks to its focus on providing a great education to anyone who wants it (lower costs). Fridays focus on soft skills so you have activities like lunch roulette, guest speakers, small group discussions on issues affecting the tech community, etc.

Answered by graduate Marina C on August 12th, 2016

There is a lot of room for personal and professional growth. You are encouraged along the way but your hands are not held. You determine your own level of involvement. This is the 22nd century of how schools will be. Focused, integrated learning with no filler beyond the associated fields. Your'e here to learn a new skill, a new language, and a new career. That being said, the culture is very much what you bring. Each cohort (class) develops it's own rhythm. You are working on projects with team members constantly. Soft skills are taught and learned along the way. Focused yet relaxed (open) is how I would describe it.

Answered by graduate Zach R on August 12th, 2016

Constantly evolving, which can add some growing pains that can be difficult to adjust to. The students are all there on purpose, with intent and drive, which seems simple and obvious but is amazing to be around. Social issues that affect the tech industry are discussed openly, which I appreciate.

Answered by graduate Viki H on August 15th, 2016

I felt that everyone at Turing can relate to the struggles you are experiencing and was very willing to help. They have done a great job building a welcoming, friendly environment.

Answered by graduate Drew R on August 15th, 2016

The culture is open, caring, rigorous, and iterative. Students, staff and mentors care about one another. They make themselves available, whether or not to debug, clarify on concepts, or provide a listening ear. I found teachers not only in staff and mentors, but also in my peers.

Answered by graduate Ling T on August 16th, 2016

The culture at Turing is the most welcoming and inclusive I have ever been a part of. They care deeply about diversity and respect, and work hard to foster a community that values these things.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

It was great! There is no environment where people are so thirsty to learn and Turing does a great job of quenching that thirst. Turing does an amazing job of teaching you how to learn programming languages. They don't have you just memorize syntaxes.

Answered by graduate Paul Grever on August 16th, 2016

Very inclusive. There is an obvious mission to help diversify the tech industry and to cultivate a safe and aware student body. This is the main way that I saw Turing go above and beyond on a daily basis, and the number one reason I would recommend it.

Answered by graduate Penney Garrett on August 17th, 2016

Turing is special. It doesn't feel like I expected a bootcamp to feel. Turing is intentional about trying to create a community of developers that more closely reflects the diversity of the larger community. Students can have a healthy competition as well as a strong support system.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

It's amazing to walk into Turing late at night on a weekend, for one reason or another, and see like a dozen people sitting around working on stuff. The amount of passion and excitement that people tend to have is contagious.

Answered by graduate Jeff Ruane on August 17th, 2016

Overall, inclusive. They really strive for diversity and try to provide various activities to get students from all parts of the program interacting with each other.

Answered by graduate Rose Kohn on August 17th, 2016

Welcoming, inclusive, supportive, and most importantly, grounded in extremely high academic expectations. Turing is all about setting an extremely high bar for success and working your butt off to meet that bar.

Answered by graduate Travis Haby on August 17th, 2016

Turing puts a very large (but much needed) emphasis on discussing and improving the gender/racial bias within the software industry. There is also a culture of instructors pushing students to their academic limits which creates a very focused and hard-working atmosphere which is uplifting and motivating (to me, at least).

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

The culture at Turing is very inclusive, and I would say the opposite of laid back. It can be pretty intense, it's fast paced and high stakes.

Answered by graduate Kristina B on August 17th, 2016

Motivated. Everyone is an adult on a mission. Teamwork. You cannot get through this program without learning how to work closely with your peers.

Answered by graduate Laura W on August 17th, 2016

Supportive, Competitive, and overall really friendly and fulfilling. I met a diverse number of people all sorts of socioeconomic, age, and racial groups and I had a great time in addition to gaining a full education

Answered by graduate Jeffrey Wan on August 17th, 2016

It's kind of weird. Turing promotes a culture of tolerance, respect, fairness, and accountability. Traditional "brogrammer" jerk-types would have a very hard time here because they won't fit in and their behavior won't be tolerated. That is great. But the social justice agenda is emphasized ad nauseam. The school would argue that its important enough to justify such persistence. But as a career-changer spending nearly $20K, I want the best education as my product. I can read blogs and articles and formulate my own notions of ethics in tech.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

The culture really emphasizes community and how we can all work together to create a community that we want to see, at Turing, in the tech world, and the world at large. They sincerely try their best and keep working at creating an inclusive environment and empowering people to be the best they can be.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Anonymous on August 12th, 2016

Answer

The instructors were effective, especially those who had previous teaching experience. There are some instructors that did not have that experience and it could be felt in the lessons, but I believe they have done well in supporting those people so that they can become effective teachers.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 12th, 2016

My instructors were highly effective both in their experiential knowledge of programming but also in their educational proficiencies to dispense that knowledge.

Answered by graduate Adam Caron on August 12th, 2016

The instructors were brilliant. Most, if not all of them had previous real world experience as a teacher and a software engineer. All went above and beyond the call, staying late nights or early mornings giving extra tutoring and help where it was needed.

Answered by graduate Daniel G on August 12th, 2016

The instructors not only know how to program, but are genuinely vested in the best interests of the students. Jeff Casimir, the director of the school, has a huge emphasis on the educational aspect as well as social justice. Look forward to a very diverse student body and instructional staff.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 12th, 2016

Very. The top talent in programming school environments. I had several instructors take time outside of school to go over things I was fuzzy one, and there is an extensive mentor network available only to Turing students.

Answered by graduate Dave Maurer on August 12th, 2016

Overall, instructors were always available to help answer questions, even weekends and evenings. It really speaks to their commitment to your education. Lessons are often half the day, but most learning comes from the projects and the evaluations/ pairings you have with instructors. I'm interested to see if the quality will stay as the program expands.

Answered by graduate Marina C on August 12th, 2016

They were very effective. Each instructor is different and can improve your learning in different ways of understanding programming. Relatively speaking, they are extremely new as a scholastic institution. I was dubious about certain instructor choices while and after I had graduated, but they are still learning and the program is only getting better.

Answered by graduate Zach R on August 12th, 2016

I really appreciated the balance between instructors who are very much in the code mindset and instructors who have more of a foundation in education. I feel like that combination was very effective for me. It definitely takes hard work on the part of the students, but it's no small effort for the instructors either, who put in many hours outside of the regular workday, and they are upfront about the fact that it takes some serious gumption and you're going to need to be all-in for the duration of the program.

Answered by graduate Viki H on August 15th, 2016

The instructors at Turing are very similar to the students in that they all come form very diverse backgrounds. This helps students feel that anyone really can grasp the material at hand if they try hard enough.

Answered by graduate Drew R on August 15th, 2016

Instructors who lead the classes are top notch programmers who enjoy teaching. If anything is confusing, they will take the time to clarify. They are also responsive to feedback, whether during class, Slack channel/messages, or weekly surveys or group retrospectives.

Answered by graduate Ling T on August 16th, 2016

Instructors were very effective. They all care about the students a lot, and are teachers just as much (if not more!) than they are programmers, making the teaching quality at Turing much higher than most coding schools.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

The instructors go above and beyond what any teach has done. They truly care about the education they are providing and are so approachable and assessable.

Answered by graduate Paul Grever on August 16th, 2016

Extremely. I was consistently impressed and felt very supported. It was very clear to me that each and every instructor cares very deeply about what they do.

Answered by graduate Penney Garrett on August 17th, 2016

For the most part, the instructors are solid. There are a few who could use more development in growing into more effective teachers. Most of them, though, understand the material they're teaching and are able to clearly explain it in a way that makes sense to newbies.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

Very. They put in long hours, and really care about the students. They try to push you to make you stronger and do things you didn't know you were capable of.

Answered by graduate Rose Kohn on August 17th, 2016

Instructors were generally pretty effective, and always very receptive to feedback and genuinely interested in making sure you learn. They would put in extra time to help when you needed it. There's definitely room to improve some instructional practices but I think they actually just made a recent hire of an instructional coach to address this.

Answered by graduate Travis Haby on August 17th, 2016

Very effective. Some instructors are better than others, but really it comes down to the individual to master the concept at hand. All instructors were patient and down to assist any student that needed help.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

The instructors at Turing are very effective, some of the best teachers I've ever encountered, and they all really care about what they are doing.

Answered by graduate Kristina B on August 17th, 2016

Extremely. Instructors were almost always around and available for questions, sometimes at extreme hours of the day. They worked hard to keep in touch with the students and to teach and reteach topics when needed, but also to push us to our limits.

Answered by graduate Laura W on August 17th, 2016

Very. They had a solid pedagogical background and a solid understanding of computer science and programming and were always generous with their time.

Answered by graduate Jeffrey Wan on August 17th, 2016

Instructors were mostly outstanding. The good ones were extremely prepared, receptive to questions, willing to work 1-on-1 off-hours, diligent with feedback, etc. One or two were not good. Examples include an instructor who was perpetually unprepared for lessons and project check-ins. Others would sometimes fall into making slight (likely accidental) jabs at student code or ideas ("neckbeard rearing its nasty head"). But all-in-all, this should be considered a strong point.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

The instructors were the most committed teachers I've ever met. The diversity of educators turned programmers and programmers turned educators on staff creates a great pool of perspectives and styles to learn from.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Anonymous on August 12th, 2016

Answer

If you're genuinely interested, contact Turing and if it's a good fit, they'll go above and beyond to help propel you into the next phase of your career and life.

Answered by graduate Adam Caron on August 12th, 2016

Don't try and half ass it. You ultimately are in control of how much you learn and how far you get out of the program. Immerse yourself completely and go down rabbit holes that interest you. It's a very unique experience so make it worthwhile.

Answered by graduate Daniel G on August 12th, 2016

Turing is hands down the hardest feat I have ever taken on. There are days when you feel on top of the world and days when you feel like a failure - don't give up because I promise it will change your life for good.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 12th, 2016

Before you attend: Do your pre-work more than three times, then do tutorials. And you may still not be ready. It's hard, but sooo worth it if you stick it out. Seriously though. Do MORE pre-studying than you think you need to, unless you can make the equivalent of the board game Mastermind on your computer in two days already. Then you are probably good to go...until module two starts.

Answered by graduate Dave Maurer on August 12th, 2016

This is the hardest thing you will ever do. Seven months is a long time. Stay focused. Ask lots of questions, and know that mostly everyone is struggling at some point. There's a huge network of mentors, so reach out when you're lost.

Answered by graduate Marina C on August 12th, 2016

Work your ass of. It'll be the 7 hardest but most rewarding months of your life. Explore all your networks, use all your available resources. If you apply yourself you will be rewarded.

Answered by graduate Zach R on August 12th, 2016

Make sure your ducks are all in a row before you start. Evaluate your support system and responsibilities. Expect that you're not going to have much of a social life outside of Turing for seven months, but this is OK. You won't turn into a zombie, it'll be fine. You probably need to put in what may be an unhealthy and unsustainable amount of time and effort into the program, but it's only seven months; there's an end in a relatively short amount of time, so it's OK if it's unsustainable long term. Expect some 12 hour days and some 7 day weeks (including project work), but also make sure you sleep, eat and otherwise take care of your body - your body houses your brain, and you need that to be functioning well to succeed in the program. I also think it's important to note that this program is not for everyone. Some students have overcome some pretty serious obstacles in order to make it work for them, but do seriously consider whether it is doable for you before you begin. Some questions you might ask yourself: Can I attend school every weekday for the next seven months? Do I have health issues that may cause me to miss days, and if so, can I figure out something workable with the staff at Turing? Can I afford to live for seven months without working? Can I make myself put in the work to find the job at the end, even if I hate job hunting with a passion?

Answered by graduate Viki H on August 15th, 2016

The advice I always give to any new student is that you should never be afraid to ask for help. Everyone has been where you are now at some point or another and you're only hurting yourself the longer you wait.

Answered by graduate Drew R on August 15th, 2016

(1) The pre-work is designed to help make ease the transition in the early weeks and will carry forth for the rest of your time at Turing. I recommend getting as familiar with the concepts introduced as possible. (2) The rigor at Turing is great for anyone who likes to push themselves. (3) Setting mini goals for each module aside from merely focusing on passing them will allow you to enjoy all the victories along your journey to completing the program. And it can help remind you of the joys of programming!

Answered by graduate Ling T on August 16th, 2016

Be prepared to be challenged, both intellectually and mentally. Be open minded to it. Take a vacation right before you start. Don't let anyone tell you there's a "right" way to program.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 16th, 2016

Be ready to work hard and put in long hours. It's hard, but it's worth it. Soak in every moment and treasure it, cause once it's done you will miss it.

Answered by graduate Paul Grever on August 16th, 2016

See above. The pace at Turing is intense, so the more familiarity you can have with basic concepts and your environment before jumping in, the better your overall experience will be.

Answered by graduate Penney Garrett on August 17th, 2016

Ask for support, admit when you're in over your head, know it's okay to cry at Turing, and figure out what you can contribute to the community.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

Put the rest of your life on hold while you're there. Also, use that time as best you can, explore new things and experiment a lot, because there won't be much time for that kind of thing on the job.

Answered by graduate Jeff Ruane on August 17th, 2016

Prepare to be overwhelmed. Turing is the hardest thing I've ever done. But it's worth it. Get involved with the community, and don't be afraid to reach out. Mentors, alum, teachers, and current students are all incredible resources that can really help make the difference in your experience.

Answered by graduate Rose Kohn on August 17th, 2016

Ask as many questions as possible, and make sure you do things 'the hard way' to train yourself to use best practices in software development until they become second nature. Also, be ready to fail--a lot. Failure is good, as long as you learn from it. If you focus on getting better every day and let go of comparisons to other people or your personal expectations you will give yourself the space to grow rapidly.

Answered by graduate Travis Haby on August 17th, 2016

Learn as much coding as you can prior to Turing because it'll make your life easier. Also, Turing can create stressors in other parts of your life, especially relationships. Make sure the other parties know what you are getting yourself into and it's very crucial they are also understanding of the demands Turing will have for the next 7 months. Use the off weeks to catch up on life!

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

It's going to be hard but listen to the instructors and do what they tell you to, because they have a tested and proven system. There are going to be extremely stressful times, try to enjoy it.

Answered by graduate Kristina B on August 17th, 2016

Learn some Ruby and Rails beforehand even though you would be fine entering without any. But why not enter with some background in Ruby and Rails. Read the Michael Hartl tutoril and do some rubymonk beforehand.

Answered by graduate Jeffrey Wan on August 17th, 2016

Be prepared to work as hard or harder than you ever have. If you're not picking up the material you will not succeed. They only graduate students who pass the curriculum. If you're a white male, you will be indirectly humiliated by their social justice agenda. And if you're a white male (and don't brown-nose), you probably won't get much direct help with job leads, either.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

I would suggest they take time to relax and spend time with family and friends before starting Turing, because it's a very intense program. Technically, I'd suggest they learn keyboard shortcuts and try to do the prework without using a mouse. That was the one main thing I wish I had known about and done beforehand.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

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