Coding Dojo Reviews

4.0 / 5

New York, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dallas

all bootcamps

Coding Dojo doesn't want you to just learn a new programming language, they want you to learn how to learn (remember that adage about giving a fish vs. teaching fishing). They teach their students numerous languages because technology changes so frequently that the best skill they can teach you is how to adapt to those changes and be successful. In fact, they dedicate the first 5 weeks to learning the fundamentals like database design and MVC frameworks with minimal programming language lessons.

After the fundamentals section, you spend the next three weeks on JavaScript, three weeks on Ruby on Rails and the last week preparing you for after bootcamp including Demo Day. Demo Day is an opportunity for you to show off your projects to hiring partners and, hopefully, get an offer. Throughout the course, you should have created 3 (1 JavaScript, 2 Ruby on Rails) projects to demonstrate on Demo Day.

On a day to day basis, expect to spend most of your time coding. At the end of each topic, you will show your mastery through a qualifying exam. These exams are used to earn "belts" organized much like the karate system. There are five belt levels including an optional black belt level.

There are also some great perks to the program including FREE FOOD! You do have to find your own housing, but they will connect you with other classmates to help you find roommates.

To apply, just go online and fill out their application and send in your resume. If you are a good fit, they will schedule a phone or Skype interview with you. While they don't require a computer science or programming background, applicants without one should be able to demonstrate a considerable amount of learning on their own. Expect to hear back in two business days after the interview.

LAMP MEAN Python Ruby on Rails iOS

[email protected]
http://codingdojo.com

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Coding Dojo programs

Programs Cities Duration Cost
Program: Bootcamp Cities: New York, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dallas Duration: 14 weeks Cost: $9,450 in Dallas and $13,495 everywhere else
Brand-new and experienced developers alike can sign up for one of Coding Dojo’s 14-week bootcamps in Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York City, Seattle, and Dallas. The onsite bootcamp immerses students in learning all about three stacks, which prepares them for a variety of jobs in web and software development. At least 92% of Coding Dojo graduates land jobs within three months of completing their studies.

Coding Dojo reviews

36 reviews

Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

  • Coding Dojo review

    My overall review of coding dojo definitely met my expectation. I applied to multiple bootcamps and what I found unique about this bootcamp was they offered Algorithms. I didn't see any other bootcamp have this. Algorithms are crucial to know and understand, especially during an interview. Top companies are going to ask you these challenges, whether BST, string sort, array etc. Coding dojo prepares their students in becoming self sufficient developers. Yes, they do offer 3 to 5 stacks such as PHP, Python, IOS, Ruby, and MEAN stack, but overall, they want us to be sufficient developers. The instructors are absolutely helpful although, they won't give you the answer, they will give you hints in hoping to help you think deeper and googling your answer instead of always relying on them. Not only that but this bootcamp is 100% on hands experience. Projects, Projects, and tons of Hackathons! Coding dojo also offers graduate students a chance to put their skills to the test in participating in a scrum project. I spent 10+ hours at the dojo. Students would spend a long period of time at the dojo coding and working. We also have fun time by going outside and playing volleyball or any other sports on Wednesday. I strongly recommend Coding Dojo!

    Answered by graduate Mona Marie Cook on August 1st, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    You must be self-motivated to do well at Coding Dojo. Coding Dojo is a one size fits all program that does not provide individual instruction. Coding Dojo provides the material and it up to you to find other in your cohort to decode the assignments.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 1st, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    I had the best learning experience. The courses are so very well structured that it gives one the ability to grasp the full stack development knowledge and skills in such a short period of time as well giving one a strong foundation in what they learned that they can with ease pick up other languages that were not touched upon during the course of the bootcamp.

    Answered by graduate Hershy K on August 2nd, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    Great place to learn modern technologies and to grow your confidence as a developer. Before the Dojo I was self taught and never had some real world experience or how other developer did things. Coding Dojo helped me sharpen my skill sets and gain the confidence I needed to go out on the real world. It was a great experienced that changed my career for the better.

    Answered by graduate Ray Oleaga on August 2nd, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    Intro: You know, I think I'll start this out with what a lot of people are really concerned about-- employment outcomes. The 92% employment rate I've seen thrown around hasn't been updated in over a year and always struck me as kind of shady, considering their lack of transparency about the data. (They did, however, address that and tell us they were working on collecting data to update it.) Anyway, anecdotally, everyone in my cohort who wasn't still in college and actually put an honest effort into their job search was employed within 3 months of graduating. Some actually started their search while going through the program and had job offers before they'd even graduated. This isn't necessarily representative of the program's success rate as a whole, but I just thought I'd give you some actual real-life outcomes to consider. This includes students who'd struggled and often lagged behind throughout the program, which you're allowed to do because Coding Dojo doesn't kick people out for lagging behind. This was because, what some students lacked in talent, they made up for in sheer effort and determination. To get the most out of this program, you need to be there from sun-up to sun-down. You need to be constantly learning, writing code, practicing algorithms, asking questions, and mentoring others if you can (while still taking occasional breaks to play ping-pong or go out to lunch with you cohortmates/new friends). Do all that and, for 98% of people, you will get a job. It might be challenging and take a while, and you may have to start out in a less-than-ideal position, but you'll get a job. That's pretty much true of any coding bootcamp out there. So onto my review about this one. My main review: Coding Dojo essentially provides a good primer on 3 different stacks. You don't go into the depth you would at a bootcamp that focuses entirely on one stack, but I'd say they succeed in their mission of making you a versatile coder. They show you the common patterns between different technologies and frameworks, which makes it easier to learn new things down the line. I call it a "primer" because even more popular bootcamps are criticized for not providing adequate depth for more than a junior-level position. Though CD only spends about a month on each stack, they do still get through a lot. Really, I think one of the main differences in curriculum between CD and other bootcamps is that CD doesn't fit in much time for projects, which is where a lot of the real learning happens. It's one thing to attend lectures and toy with sample code, it's another thing entirely to try to get an entire application up and running by yourself (or with a group). When I went through the program, each month we spent about the first 3 weeks learning a new stack, which culminated in a "Belt Exam" (to go with the dojo theme) where you were tested on the material you learned via a challenge to build an application with certain features. Those 3 weeks and the subsequent exam seem really challenging when you're going through them, but in retrospect, they really only cover the bare minimum of building an app in that stack. The 4th week, project week, is where you actually go beyond basic things like login/registration and page rendering, and start working on integrating APIs and making an app like you'd see in real life. Luckily, you generally work with a group to do this. Figuring out Git/GitHub is about half the battle, particularly early on. Personally, my main issue looking back is that, for all that we learned in the bootcamp, I probably (or most definitely) have found the same information in articles, tutorials, books, and (much, much) cheaper online lessons, such as on Udemy or Udacity. Of course, the reason I wanted to go to a bootcamp in the first place was that I had trouble self-teaching and wanted an experience with more guidance (and the credibility from attending some semblance of a school, the value of which might vary between employers). At that, the bootcamp was an excellent experience. It's just sort of rough knowing now that I could have found all the same (or more in-depth) material online for a small fraction of the price, but without the environment, support, and mentorship that comes from attending a bootcamp in person. It's also incredibly more helpful to be surrounded by other students who are struggling with the same things and can help and motivate you. Case in point, a couple weeks in, we were joined by another student who was in Coding Dojo's "hybrid bootcamp", meaning that he went through part of the program remotely before coming on-site to complete the rest. He'd been at it for I believe 6 weeks already, but when he joined, he was at about the same place in the curriculum that we were. He'd made the same progress in 6 weeks that we'd made in 2. So basically it's an expensive program, but if you're seeking a classroom environment and instructors/classmates to help motivate you, Coding Dojo is a good place.

    Answered by graduate Armand De Asis on August 2nd, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    Great experience! Basically you get what you put into it. I think they provide you all the resources you need in order to be successful. People come into the program for many different reasons. For me, it was exactly what I needed to become a self sufficient developer.

    Answered by graduate Mike Bogosian on August 8th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    taught me everything I know to be a front end developer and change my career

    Answered by graduate Herman Iv on September 19th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    My Instructor was great, but she left shortly after. Michael Choi is a mediocre developer, but a good businessman. They seem to be light on quality control and more focused on churn.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 15th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    Good, but needed to mature and have better processes in place for real world learning. Example, instead of having tutors to video reviews on code, have student submit projects via GitHub and have tutors review code there.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 15th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    It is the best experience ever. I learned a lot of thins from this bootcamp. Going from having completely no knowledge of web development to right now landed a job in this field, im absolutely grateful that I chose this bootcamp at the beginning.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 15th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    I really enjoyed my time spent at Coding Dojo. It was a supportive, upbeat environment. Everyone wanted everyone else to do well. I liked the learning platform because you can work at your pace.

    Answered by graduate Alicia F on August 15th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    the coding dojo learned me not only the basics to know but also they best way howe to approach all the problems i did not learn.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 19th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    When I went you got what you put into it, and I put a lot in. It gave me the basic foundation to get an entry level position. From there I had the skills necessary to shoot for the starts. I give it only 4 stars because when I went it was brand new and very rough. It has come a long way I bet.

    Answered by graduate Joseph D on September 14th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    They didn't give me a fish. They gave me a fishing pole. Because of my time there I have been able to successfully adapt to all stacks, not just the four I learned while attending.

    Answered by graduate Charles H on September 14th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    I attended a few years ago in one of their first few cohorts when their curriculum was still in somewhat of a startup phase. I think it is important to be mention that I had ZERO coding experience at that time and it was quite a lot to absorb at such a fast pace. Now, after a few years of tech and coding experience, I look back and realize that they did everything right. These last few years have seen a rise in number of bootcamps and I have attended a couple. I have even hired from one of them. They have all learned a lot from each other and with each new cohort they learn how to be better. The only reason I am giving 4/5 stars is because the program was new and there is always room for improvement. Following lean methodologies,"Build an MVP, put it on the market Find someone to pay for it. Iterate. Make it Better." And they did that. It's like finding an old car that runs perfectly. Nothing is wrong with it, but it could maybe use a few coats of polish and wax ... And I have no doubt whatsoever that the bright and talented founders and people running CodingDojo have done just that. I am now the Cofounder and CEO of a funded startup that turns 1 year old on October 1st 2016. Had I not been accepted and attended CodingDojo and got exposed to web development, I may not be in this position, building something awesome and happy. I am in no way holding CodingDojo accountable for me dropping out early. I was the one that was not ready for the struggle and fast pace and I can't blame them for my shortcomings. I have nothing but good things to say about them and highly recommend them. After being around 4 other bootcamps since 2013, I have experience and can compare them and rank them high. Thank you CodingDojo!

    Answered by graduate Brent Vossler on September 14th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    Coding Dojo now only taught me three full front-to-back-end web development stacks but each lesson built upon the last! The instructors were all extraordinarily accessible, hands-on, knowledgeable and very engaging. Coding Dojo also took great measures to ensure we were studying algorithms everyday and featured a post-bootcamp job career course with interview practice!

    Answered by graduate Douglas Pleger on September 14th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    Effective hands on learning

    Answered by graduate Jason Thai on September 14th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    Coding Dojo is a great bootcamp that helps you learn all the fundamentals you need to learn if you're new to coding or enhancing your skills. The bootcamp is very intense; learning 3 full stacks in 14 weeks is definitely a challenge. The instructors and ta's are passionate, driven, and incredibly helpful. Coding Dojo and the instructors will push you to reach your greatest potential as a Software/Web Developer because they believe you can do it. They'll do their best to help you grasp the knowledge and work with you to ensure you get it down.

    Answered by graduate Diana Lim on September 14th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    It's such a great learning environment. Everyone is very helpful, including the other students. The staff is great about letting you struggle when they know that you will eventually break through.

    Answered by graduate Andrew S on September 14th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    The Dojo was a good experience for me, and I'm glad I attended. The coursework was a bit buggy and disorganized, and they could have used a couple more instructors given the number of students, but I would still recommend. I attended in early 2014.

    Answered by graduate Chris Clark on September 15th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    Instructional materials needed polish. They provided the necessary info, but were sometimes unclear. Instructors were good, but not excellent. Out of a class of 25, 10 dropped out.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 15th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    The Coding Dojo is really awesome, they teach you multiple full stacks in 3 months! More technologies to be more prepared to join the workforce, not to mention that learning three full stacks helps you learn how to learn a new stack incase of job requirements or the place you work has decided to change. The staff are knowledgable and they are constantly updating their platform to be relevant in the updating technologies

    Answered by graduate Max R on September 16th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    The instructors were knowledgeable and really dedicate their time to helping the students grasp these concepts. It was a really enjoyable and fun place to be - as long as you make friends with your cohort -, which made 12-15hr long days not feel so long. The only reason I give it 4 out of 5 is because it is heavier on the back-end logic than on the front-end. I really learned a lot when it comes to the logic, wiring up, and dealing with servers and databases - so it's great with that - but for most new developers who will most likely be getting jobs in the front-end department, there is a lot more independent research and learning needed. However, tech and programs are always changing so you will constantly be learning new things out in the real world. Overall, for me, going in to this program was worth it. I learned a lot, had a great time, and made some great friends.

    Answered by graduate Rylin on September 19th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    The atmosphere, support for Learning and also very importantly the support for finding my first jobs were excellent

    Answered by graduate Bryan Myers on September 19th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    Coding Dojo helps students from the very beginning to even post graduation.

    Answered by graduate Elizabeth A on September 19th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    It prepared me well and was a good introduction to a huge amounts of concepts and languages.

    Answered by graduate Tyler D on September 19th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    The quality of the material you have access to is like sitting on a gold mine. Attending Coding Dojo was one of the best decisions I've ever made.

    Answered by graduate Jose Chery on September 19th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    Very intense training to produce a good developer. Best part is the environment and people there.

    Answered by graduate Ketan K on September 19th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    It was pretty awful. I was in one of the first classes and the instructors were pretty much graduates themselves. They had no idea what they were doing and obviously weren't talented enough to get a position directly out of the bootcamp.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 20th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    half of my cohort left due to very poor teaching from the lead instructor. Several got partial or full refunds because of this.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 20th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    I was told I would have lifetime access to the material, but now I have to pay more to get access to the lessons I've already taken. I was also promised that lunch would be provided, but it ended up being a few boxes of granola bars and some other random snacks.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 20th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    At the time that I joined they were preparing for a move to new building which left some confusion and disarray.

    Answered by graduate Derek G on September 20th, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    Still many things to improve, but a great school overall

    Answered by Anonymous on September 21st, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    I would have scored it higher, if I had had more help when I needed it. Often the TA's stay busy with other students and when it would be my turn to get help it was past their work hours and they had to leave. I liked the instructors, and they did offer walk through and such, but I explained that the material wasn't in order, nor was it easy to understand. The daily algorithm challenges were great, but I never completely understood them until they walked me through it. I wanted to know what the rules for creating algorithms were, not just show me the answers.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 21st, 2016

  • Coding Dojo review

    Pros: 1) Lots of information can be learned from the instructors when you are onsite 2) They cover lots of coding information in a short time. Their learning platform is loaded with lots of information 3) Length of time the bootcamp runs for is just right 4) Some of the instructors are really good at teaching 5) All of the instructors are really good at coding Cons: 1) Instructors change often between classes. This causes difficulty in transitions. 2) Lots of instructors are learning their class for the first time. This means, they aren't often ready to teach it properly based on where the technology stands today. 3) Lectures are infrequent and, with the wrong instructor, might never occur. This reduces the significant benefit of onsite bootcamp versus the remote. 4) Platform information is often wrong and the feedback system for it is poor. 5) Classroom communications are often poor. When a lecture is done, most instructors don't record or give a means of reviewing this information. 6) When learning platform changes occur, it is rarely communicated to those currently using the learning platform. 7) Wireless works terribly throughout the entire building. They have no support staff onsite so if it breaks be prepared to go home. 8) Often times, you will be in a rotating classroom as they are overfilling the classes. This means, you might be rotating around the building each week. 9) What snacks they have is not well coordinated. There are numerous times where there is nothing available as they keep trying to order low to reduce costs 10) Numerous days will be interrupted by the staff as they decide they want to do an investor walk-through that day. This will happen several times through the bootcamp and without warning 11) Algorithms are done in a haphazard way. No structure is there, no real assignments are ever given, it is treated as an after-thought and has no real instructor or curriculum. Don't expect much here. 12) Exams are done with the need to deploy, but this is often note tested properly before exam time. 13) Instructors are often in meetings with the other staff numerous times through a given day. This means, you won't have your instructors handy for questions or assistance a lot of times. 14) You don't get to chose your instructor and the instructor for a topic can change each month (see earlier complaints about instructors) Conclusions: The idea Coding Dojo has for teaching students to code in a short time is a great idea. As it stands right now, the cost of the onsite bootcamp does not make sense over the remote options. The structure of the classes, lack of consistent lecturing and documenting of projects and assignment, and lack of onsite coordination makes the onsite option undesirable. With some efforts on keeping the class sizes to a max threshold, ensuring the teachers are ready for the classes they are teaching, and making sure the facilities are maintained by professional support staff they could really create a proper and functional classroom experience. As it stands today, I would recommend looking at other institutions or consider their remote options if you are in the Seattle area.

    Answered by Anonymous on November 22nd, 2016

  • Coding Dojo Online review

    The class was very challenging but really a lot of fun. Being a remote student I missed out on the team/cohort aspect but I enjoyed making my own schedule and going at my own pace. I'm now employed as a software developer and love my new job so Coding Dojo was totally worth it.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 8th, 2016

Talk with Coding Dojo graduates

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Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

How would you describe the culture at Coding Dojo?

Posted by Anonymous on August 1st, 2016

Answer

The culture there is very friendly, hardworking, and determined! The diversity is huge at coding dojo its beautiful to see people come all over the place to learn to code. We've had people come internationally, Mid west, to east coast. The culture overall, is like a giant family support base. Helping each other out!

Answered by graduate Mona Marie Cook on August 1st, 2016

It's like a Fraternity house, Ping Pong, lots of socialization, noise, pizza, inappropriate comments, smoking/vaping, and very little quiet.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 1st, 2016

The atmosphere and vibe that the founder encourages is one of that if one is passionate about becoming a great developer and tries hard enough anyone can do it. I think that was one of the biggest tools that I received there. Never to give up and you will definitely succeed!

Answered by graduate Hershy K on August 2nd, 2016

Friendly, intense, fun, creative, long hours, sometimes you will feel lost but you will always, always find the way out. Every learn is full of intense knowledge and learning experiences not only in development but about yourself.

Answered by graduate Ray Oleaga on August 2nd, 2016

The culture was actually very supportive and uplifting. Most students seemed to bond very well within their cohort, and got along fairly well with other cohorts. Everyone pretty much struggles together, and pretty much everyone is willing to help each other, no matter how big the skill difference. With cohorts of a few dozen students, inevitably certain people tend to hang out together more than others, but I didn't really notice may cliques forming, at least while I was there. Everyone pretty much got along.

Answered by graduate Armand De Asis on August 2nd, 2016

Everybody who is doing the onsite program is there to achieve their goals. It creates a positive working environment for people who sometimes need a little extra push. Everyone is positive and always willing to provide a little extra support if you're just not getting it.

Answered by graduate Mike Bogosian on August 8th, 2016

laid back

Answered by graduate Herman Iv on September 19th, 2016

Very startup type of culture. Work hard, work long, get the knowledge in as fast as you can. The instructors were terrific, the students were fun, save for 2 or 3 bad apples.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

They want you to be there to learn. There is no judging on how well you do, what they care is that whether you try your best to learn. The courses are intense, so don't expect to be there to chill. You have to devote your time and learn, and i guarantee you that you will the most out from this bootcamp.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

The culture at Coding Dojo was friendly, fun, engaging, supportive. Your classmates become your close friends. The teachers become mentors and really care about your progress.

Answered by graduate Alicia F on August 15th, 2016

if you going to be modest, helpfull and put your time in, you will have a happy coding experience.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Open, easy, self paced.

Answered by graduate Joseph D on September 14th, 2016

Inclusive. Understanding. They listen and can often times can cater to individual needs.

Answered by graduate Charles H on September 14th, 2016

Very constructive and engaging. Everyone there, wants to be there. Its nice to be in a room full of motivated and individuals and people that get excited about code and seeing their projects come to life.

Answered by graduate Brent Vossler on September 14th, 2016

Attentive, structured and engrossing. Admittedly, at first, it felt overwhelming and intimidating. But after the first week-and-a-half, give or take, I was eager to spend every bit of everyday there. Everyone was encouraged to keep asking questions and keep helping one another. The staff was morally supportive and made sure everyone kept on the same page while learning.

Answered by graduate Douglas Pleger on September 14th, 2016

People were very friendly. Built contaderie in my class.

Answered by graduate Jason Thai on September 14th, 2016

The atmosphere is very relaxing and it has a family oriented feel. The students are all in similar positions; different backgrounds, learning how to code either for the first time or brushing up their skills. With that, everyone is empathetic to one another and sociable. Coding Dojo encourages you to help one another, especially because it helps render and solidify the information for your knowledge base.

Answered by graduate Diana Lim on September 14th, 2016

Friendly, focused, and team oriented.

Answered by graduate Andrew S on September 14th, 2016

People were cool.

Answered by graduate Chris Clark on September 15th, 2016

Staff was friendly. Students were a bit too rowdy and weren't kept under control by the instructor, so a couple loud-mouth students ended up dominating the instructional sessions. At the end of my time there, the owner cleaned house, firing all but 3 of the staff and starting over, so I would not be surprised if the culture was a lot different now.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

Friendly and relaxed, yet focused

Answered by graduate Max R on September 16th, 2016

Really fun culture - as long as you choose to participate in it. The best thing you can do is get to know the people in your cohort. You will be together for three months, and it can get exhausting, so taking time to step away from the computer to go play a couple games of ping pong with classmates will keep you sane. I am still in communication with people from my cohort, and you never know if one of your classmates will toss your name in for a job opportunity. There is also a kitchen so that you can either bring your own food, or just walk out the front door and have so many choices of restaurants in downtown Burbank that are walking distance.

Answered by graduate Rylin on September 19th, 2016

Everyone, from the instructors to the students were all first class.

Answered by graduate Bryan Myers on September 19th, 2016

Everyone was nice and some people where more helpful and willing to help than others. The instructors were welcoming and willing to work one on one to get things understood.

Answered by graduate Elizabeth A on September 19th, 2016

The culture is great. There's nothing better than being surrounding by students with a drive for success.

Answered by graduate Jose Chery on September 19th, 2016

Learn it hard way so that you don't lose it easily.

Answered by graduate Ketan K on September 19th, 2016

People helped each other, there were a few that got ahead, but a good many struggled and were not checked in on.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Students interacted and taught eachother, all but 1 instructor really had no idea how to teach and some only knew basic coding.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

The other students there were great.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

The instructors and the students all provide a very friendly environment. Each one pushing one another to learn from their struggles but also providing help whenever needed.

Answered by graduate Derek G on September 20th, 2016

Friendly and relaxed while hard work is needed

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 21st, 2016

Everyone was really nice, the students were nice too.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 21st, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Anonymous on August 1st, 2016

Answer

The instructors were again very helpful! They are always around when you need them and will always help you search your answer but won't give the answer. They want you to think!

Answered by graduate Mona Marie Cook on August 1st, 2016

The instructors were very knowledgeable but there should have been more demo's and more individual instruction. The instructors were not always available or weren't focused on individual achievement.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 1st, 2016

Very effective. They were knowledgable in the subject at hand and always eager and ready to assist with any questions that one had. Never was there a question that is too stupid to ask.

Answered by graduate Hershy K on August 2nd, 2016

They were very effective and knew their stack. I wold say that the instructors and there more for support and if you are really stuck in something but it is really up to you to read documentation and try to figure out the problem. They also have a 20 min rule, which is if you are stuck for more than 20 min ask a cohort for help if then both are stuck for more than 20 min ask a teacher. I found this to be very helpful and rewarding when as a team you were able to figure out a solution to your problem.

Answered by graduate Ray Oleaga on August 2nd, 2016

The instructors were actually an essential part of the culture that developed, because they were also very supportive and seemed to genuinely care about our learning. People (including graduates) can be somewhat cynical about coding bootcamps and their instructors (more on that in a bit), but something I still appreciate to this day was how dedicated the instructors were to helping us learn, even when it meant answering the same stupid questions over and over. A criticism students and graduates sometimes have is that the instructors are mostly (if not all) former graduates that immediately went on to become instructors, and thus they lack industry experience. For what they teach, this generally isn't a problem, but it's true that they have limited experience or expertise outside of the content covered in the curriculum. However, they do know the curriculum very well, which for most people is challenging enough without delving into industry practices in different domains. For what they don't know, the instructors are generally pretty helpful about directing/encouraging you to explore relevant resources online.

Answered by graduate Armand De Asis on August 2nd, 2016

Instructors at Coding Dojo are all supremely qualified. They are approachable and truly invest themselves into the students growth. I continue to stay in touch with my instructors as an alumnus.

Answered by graduate Mike Bogosian on August 8th, 2016

they are helpful and good with letting you struggle, bud if needed they know there stuff .

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Fantastic. I was taught by the founder and he is top notch

Answered by graduate Herman Iv on September 19th, 2016

I had Trey, and he was terrific. Focused on as much one on one as he could, kept a real good head on his shoulders, and gave a lot of terrific feedback.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

My instructors have a lot of knowledge in this field. They will push you, in an effective way that you might not even know that you would reach this far. They definitely taught me a lot and they also keep up with you when you graduate.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

Their effectiveness depends on how much you utilize them. They won't always know how to best help you, so you have to tell them what questions you have.

Answered by graduate Alicia F on August 15th, 2016

At the time the instructors were just previous students who did really well. They only knew a small amount more then the students. In my case, I chose to study Node.js instead of Ruby on Rails and I was largely on my own in open waters. Once again, this was in 2013 when there was only a single campus.

Answered by graduate Joseph D on September 14th, 2016

Very. I am in contact with them to this day. They pushed me hard and because of it I was ready to work the first day I was hired and I was given a full project in my first week.

Answered by graduate Charles H on September 14th, 2016

The staff was a mix of knowledgable programmers and recent cohort grads that performed well enough to be a teaching assistant. The veteran programmers were great at explaining and taking the time to make sure you understand the big picture. The TA's were knowledgable enough to get you through whatever task it is that you were stuck on for the sake of forward progress. You eventually figure out who is best positioned to help you and you just have to wait your turn for the best aids or instructors if you are truly struggling. Basically, the experienced programmers are there to help you through the tough stuff and the recent cohort grads are knowledgable enough to take care of the trivial stuff to keep students moving forward. It was a good mix.

Answered by graduate Brent Vossler on September 14th, 2016

Very much so! I wish I wasn't as reserved and shy about asking questions so often. The instructors were extraordinarily friendly, they were supportive and were wonderful about breaking concepts down to a point that everyone could understand.

Answered by graduate Douglas Pleger on September 14th, 2016

Very helpful and friendly

Answered by graduate Jason Thai on September 14th, 2016

All of the instructors were incredibly helpful. They do weekly code reviews, seeing where you're at on the platform/assignments, and helping you get it down. They enforce a 20 minute rule; tackling a problem on your own for 20 minutes (asking your peers as well), then asking a TA or instructor. If you're feeling behind(usually you're not alone), you can ask the TA or instructor to go over specifics or assignments. They'll do a demonstration to help you through it.

Answered by graduate Diana Lim on September 14th, 2016

Instructors are super helpful. They always know when to let you struggle on your own and when to give you a nudge in the right direction.

Answered by graduate Andrew S on September 14th, 2016

There could have been a few more instructors, but they were good.

Answered by graduate Chris Clark on September 15th, 2016

Instructors were knowledgeable, but when you have done extensive research trying to solve a problem and then went to them for help, they acted as if you hadn't done the necessary background work. While working on projects, the instructional aides sent me off on counterproductive side roads a couple of times. Felt like I knew more than the aides did. It should be noted that many of the people on the staff at that time were recruited from the first classes held at Coding Dojo.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

They are fairly competent, but they don't know everything, what they don't know they will point you in the right direction of where to learn more on your own if it is outside of the scope of the class

Answered by graduate Max R on September 16th, 2016

Instructors were very effective.

Answered by graduate Bryan Myers on September 19th, 2016

I had a hard time understanding algorithms and the instructors were patient enough to go over the same steps and taking different approaches until I understood.

Answered by graduate Elizabeth A on September 19th, 2016

Very

Answered by graduate Tyler D on September 19th, 2016

The instructors were very helpful. They opened my eyes to alternative, more efficient methods of completing difficult problems.

Answered by graduate Jose Chery on September 19th, 2016

Very knowledgeable and ready to help only when a student struggles. Because it is all about self-learning with minimum help.

Answered by graduate Ketan K on September 19th, 2016

Awful. It's been a long time since I took the bootcamp, so I don't remember anything in particular, but there was a severe lack of knowledge, a severe lack of empathy and consideration, and a lack of effort.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Several times Kris, when asked a question by a student had no idea and would either make a joke and walk away or go get Speros who actually knew what he was doing.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

I felt like one of the more experienced instructors really cared about us understanding what he was teaching. The other instructor had just completed the course himself and was a total noob. When I asked him how cookies worked his response was "Go google it.".

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

My instructors were very helpful whenever I needed help on a particular problem. They stressed the importance of learning through struggle and fustration. But if struggling for more than 15 minutes then ask for help and they would go through the issue with you.

Answered by graduate Derek G on September 20th, 2016

overall very usefull, but sometimes they are hard to find because there are many students per instructor

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 21st, 2016

One instructor did walk throughs with me, that is where I learned the most. Weeks of reading and videos couldn't hold a candle to what I learned when I was typing and they were talking.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 21st, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Anonymous on August 1st, 2016

Answer

The founder of Coding Dojo always tells his students to NEVER GIVE UP! Always take a break when you need it and take care of your body physically and emotionally. Network with your cohort and get to know people at the dojo. Figure out what projects you want to build! Ask yourself, "how can I take full advantage of this bootcamp?" it's alot of time and investment but it's worth it! Every student there will tell you it is!

Answered by graduate Mona Marie Cook on August 1st, 2016

You make sure you do all the preparatory course work and algorithms before the first day of the program. Do not jump into this course at the last minute. You can learn everything being taught at Coding Dojo for free online and I would suggest you exhaust those resources, attend hackathons and Meetups before you consider giving your $ to this BUSINESS.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 1st, 2016

You learn best from trial and error although getting the answer from someone else may seem like the easier route at first. Give it all you got. Work hard and you will succeed.

Answered by graduate Hershy K on August 2nd, 2016

For students new to coding I would say don't feel bad if other more advance classmates are moving at a faster pace. Coding Dojo is not the end of the road it would server more as an introductions to technologies and how to web development. For students with some background in web development my advice would be: Ask all the questions you have, fill in all the "holes" this is the time to pick the brains of more season developers, this is a great opportunity to learn from others and for you to share your knowledge also.

Answered by graduate Ray Oleaga on August 2nd, 2016

Put in the time and the work. Ask for help when you need it, and help others when you can. Teaching your fellow students will help you learn the material a lot better than by just going through the learning platform. If you have time, go beyond the curriculum and do your own research about the latest tools and practices. Read HackerNews, read any news, and actually read in depth into the technologies you're using or want to use. This is all essential to becoming an actual programmer and getting real insight into the field beyond what you learn in the classroom. Learn as much as you can on Codecademy.com before starting the bootcamp. If you wait until the bootcamp starts to begin learning code, you might lag behind the rest of the class very quickly. The more familiar you are with basic programming concepts when you start class, the better.

Answered by graduate Armand De Asis on August 2nd, 2016

Know exactly why you want to do this. It is a 14 week commitment 6 days a week and often 10-12 hour days. You need to be prepared for the physical and emotional roller coaster you go through trying to learn everything as it comes at you. Just remember, you can always go back to your work when the program is over and perfect your understanding. Don't give up!

Answered by graduate Mike Bogosian on August 8th, 2016

Do not struggle longer than 30 min

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Work hard and never give up on it

Answered by graduate Herman Iv on September 19th, 2016

Be diligent, pay attention, and put in the work. Lots of students burn out, but they don't call it a bootcamp for nothing. Also, focus as much as you can on algorithms; if you want to do anything with data structures you're going to kick yourself in the butt if you don't have a firm grasp on algorithms.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

Do the best with your project. You are going to be proud of yourself and you will see the use of it very soon! Other than that, just make times for the bootcamp and learn and ask!

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 15th, 2016

I highly recommend studying on your own a year before a bootcamp. You will get more out of the program. Write down questions to ask, and also come up with questions that ask about how the program works "under the hood".

Answered by graduate Alicia F on August 15th, 2016

stay dedicated and focused. Worry about other things later and finish all platform content and never stop coding. Definitely keep making projects

Answered by graduate Max R on September 16th, 2016

Dont quit. Dont be a debbie downer. Work your ass off. I spent 12 - 16 hours a day banging at my keyboard (only 8 on Sunday). Be the first in, last out. Just like any job.

Answered by graduate Joseph D on September 14th, 2016

Don't wait. Do it now!

Answered by graduate Charles H on September 14th, 2016

I struggled quite a bit. I even dropped out half way through. But in retrospect, they did everything right. A word of advice for any noobies out there that are in the same position that I was in, it doesn't matter WHAT bootcamp you attend... you MUST get up to speed on the fundamentals PRIOR to attending so that you are prepared to keep up with them in the bootcamp when you are piecing everying together and building something. Whether its codecademy, or youtube, or blogs, etc. Put in the hours before attending.

Answered by graduate Brent Vossler on September 14th, 2016

It's going to seem intensely overwhelming at first. But keep at it! You'll get out what you put in. So just dive head-first into it and keep swimming. Never be afraid to ask instructors and your fellow class-mates for help. Once things start to click into place it's going to be one of the best learning experiences you can hope for.

Answered by graduate Douglas Pleger on September 14th, 2016

Go in with coding knowledge or you will have a very hard time.

Answered by graduate Jason Thai on September 14th, 2016

Work on algorithms and take an HTML/CSS and/or JavaScript class before you start. It always helps to know a little more before you get into it. The school is fast paced, anything helps. Stay persistent and don't discourage yourself when you see other students become ahead of you. Everyone has a different background and story, some people have a larger advantage. Ask questions and stay humble.

Answered by graduate Diana Lim on September 14th, 2016

Be open minded and spend as much time as you can there.

Answered by graduate Andrew S on September 14th, 2016

That would depend on their skill level coming in, and what they expect to get out of it. If you have no experience and you expect to get a six figure job within a few months of graduating... that's probably not how it's going to play out.

Answered by graduate Chris Clark on September 15th, 2016

Learn as much as you can before you attend. Don't try to get the answers to every single detail as you are going through the course, or you will fall behind. Try, instead, to get a good overview of the subject matter. If you do not have coding experience, do not expect to get a job based on what you learn at the Dojo. They are not good at placing students in tech jobs.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

Really get familiar with HTML and CSS before you start onsite or online. The less time you are trying to figure this stuff out, the more time you can focus on learning the logic and wrapping your brain around concepts that might be foreign to you.

Answered by graduate Rylin on September 19th, 2016

Take time before attending a bootcamp to learn the basics so when the camp start you will have a strong foundation.

Answered by graduate Elizabeth A on September 19th, 2016

Work hard, spend time.

Answered by graduate Tyler D on September 19th, 2016

You HAVE to be disclipine. You WILL see immediate results but you have to really want it. You'll already be highly valuable & marketable to employers by just knowing your basic HTML, now just imagine being well versed in a Stack. The opportunities are truly endless.

Answered by graduate Jose Chery on September 19th, 2016

Hang on there and try to experiment and go above and beyond with the course material

Answered by graduate Ketan K on September 19th, 2016

Your money is better spent elsewhere.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Only take stacks taught by Speros

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Make sure you know some basic command line skills.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Although the instructors are there to help, most of the learning you do will be self taught and learned through hands on experience. Do not expect to be babied with your hand held throughout the program.

Answered by graduate Derek G on September 20th, 2016

Keep focused and motivated, it's a great process and it does get easier

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 21st, 2016

I would be sure to get some type of training in algorithms, especially in Javascript. They ask you to do them daily without really teaching you how first.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 21st, 2016

How would you describe the culture at Coding Dojo?

Posted by Anonymous on August 8th, 2016

Answer

I was a remote student so there wasn't much culture. I did speak to some of the other remote students and everyone was very nice. However since we were all on our own schedules we weren't on the same assignments and therefore couldn't help each other that much.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 8th, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Anonymous on August 8th, 2016

Answer

My instructor Kris was great with helping me. I worked mostly during the day and the help app was only available in the evenings. Since I didn't have classmates I had to spend a lot more time figuring issues out on my own, which isn't a bad thing in the long run.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 8th, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Anonymous on August 8th, 2016

Answer

Make sure you have enough time to complete the assignments and really absorb the material. I worked on the class 50+ hours a week and probably could have done even more.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 8th, 2016

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