General Assembly Reviews

3.8 / 5

Atlanta, Austin, Boston, Chicago, Hong Kong, London, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Sydney, Washington DC, New York, Denver, Melbourne, Singapore

all bootcamps

General Assembly offers Web Development Immersive class in 8 cities around the world. Unlike other bootcamps, GA's curriculum spends some time focusing on CS topics like runtimes of algorithms and data structures. This is great for students who've learned a lot of syntax on their own, but need to get more knowledge of best practices in computing.

They also provide job preparation from reviewing portfolios to verbal programming quizzes. Additionally, after the end of the course, they host a meet and greet with potential employers and also open applications to the GA apprenticeship program. The program is basically a 12 week paid apprenticeship with a tech company.

To apply to the program, you first fill out an application online. You will then have an informational and fit phone interview. Afterwords, you will need to complete pre-work and have another interview. This interview will be more around skills including the pre-work and logic problems. This process might vary based on which city you plan on applying to.

Java Android UI UX Git Unix SQL Python Big Data Data Science Prototyping Testing Ruby on Rails JavaScript HTML CSS

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General Assembly programs

Programs Cities Duration Cost
Program: Web Development Immersive Cities: London, Sydney, Boston, San Francisco, New York, Hong Kong, Los Angeles, Austin, Chicago, Washington DC, Seattle, Atlanta, Denver, Melbourne, Singapore Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $13,500
General Assembly’s web development bootcamp covers a variety of career-crucial topics including JavaScript and Rails. Intensive career counseling is also part of the program. General Assembly graduates will have completed several individual and group web development projects, including a primary portfolio project.
Program: User Experience Design Immersive Cities: Atlanta, Austin, Boston, Chicago, Hong Kong, London, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, Seattle, Sydney, Washington DC Duration: 10 weeks Cost: $11,500
Program: Data Science Immersive Cities: Atlanta, Austin, Boston, Chicago, Hong Kong, London, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, Seattle, Sydney, Washington DC Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $14,500
The data science immersive at General Assembly teaches the skills necessary for bootcamp recruits to successfully analyze – and present – data. Just a few of the topics covered include Python, Git, UNIX, and relational databases. Students will receive personalized career counseling (including resume and cover letter services) and meet with a variety of industry professionals.
Program: Android Development Immersive Cities: Atlanta, Austin, Boston, Chicago, Hong Kong, London, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Sydney, Washington DC Duration: 12 weeks Cost: $13,500
General Assembly’s three-month bootcamp prepares graduates for careers as Android developers. The curriculum demands that students build real Android apps, using their newly acquired skills in JavaScript, API, XML, and material design. Extensive career counseling services along with professional networking opportunities are also a key part of General Assembly’s Android development intensive.

General Assembly reviews

48 reviews

Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    Garbage with bits of knowledge dribbled in. Most 'classes' seemed like they were hacked together the day before or the morning of. Our course moderator started dating one of the instructors and favoritism ensued.

    Answered by graduate Anthony S on July 28th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    GA provides great classes and workshops geared at students looking to get into the technology field or enhance a skill set. I would definitely give it a try because of the scheduling conveniences, the option to learn fully online, in person, or hybrid approach, and the competitive cost.

    Answered by graduate Samantha S on July 29th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    Fantastic, it was really intense and rigorous. A true boot camp but the support was incredible and the efforts at job placement were great. Amazing teachers.

    Answered by Anonymous on July 30th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    From my experience with my class, GA has good curriculums, enthusiastic and competent instructors and strong job search and interview support. Being at GA is like being in the community that will support you in anyway you need to be come a developer.

    Answered by graduate Hoa Newton on August 1st, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    It was incredible - you're in the trenches developing a solid foundational understanding of web development. You're not becoming a pro, and will require a lot of practice coming out of the program (good to have someone senior to you to work with to learn quicker), but you're in an incredible spot to start your journey.

    Answered by graduate Jonathan Igner on August 1st, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    Good-- some instructors and some workshops are hit or miss, and my particular cohort was very abnormal (only 9 students, as oppose to ~25). But they are always asking for surveys and giving students the opportunity to give feedback. I did get the sense that the surveys were read and actions were taken because of them.

    Answered by graduate Juli Emmel on August 2nd, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    I took 3 separate part time classes at GA. Two were for programming (Rails, Swift) and one was Digital Marketing. I found the programming classes were a good introduction to their respective topics. These were not however as rigorous or in-depth as the full time bootcamps available. The marketing class actually had a lot of actionable steps I was able to take with my business.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 2nd, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    There is a lot of ground to cover and the go over it very quickly. You can't skip a day or coast. The work is challenging, but not frustrating. At least once a week I had my mind blown by the empowerment of some technology that we learned.

    Answered by graduate Wake Lankard on August 3rd, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    It's awesome. The instructors and assistant instructors are extremely nice and helpful. They were willing to help me even after the course was over

    Answered by Anonymous on August 3rd, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    I think it was a good experience as I learned more about coding and practices within the 6 months than i could by myself. The turn over and grading was interesting especially as they approached somethings weird. Not all the things we were taught are necessary and some days I was like "why the fuck are they showing us this" but that's also be the curriculum changes so much. Overall i recommend it.

    Answered by graduate Kyle Maxwell on August 17th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    I did a fair amount of research before committing to GA. I found them to be the most professional and current with their language offerings. The instructors were incredibly knowledgable and approachable. Their Outcomes team was a delicious cherry on the cake! Very helpful and driven to make sure their grads get employment, and the best advice leading into it.

    Answered by graduate Sean P on August 16th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    Great course that was challenging, covered relevant material with both individual assignments and group projects to build a foundation for a total beginner.

    Answered by graduate Nicole P on August 17th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    Satisfactory, would recommend to someone who is willing to put in extra work and be ok with struggling for at least 5 months after graduating

    Answered by Anonymous on August 17th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    it was ok. it definitely provided a strong stepping stone to self-improvement, but i also thought the course lacked very basic organization, and i thought one of my teachers didnt have a clue on coding.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 17th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    Great teachers, great facilities! Full encompassing of Front and Back end. Amazing work assistance after completion! I cannot recommend this place enough.

    Answered by Anonymous on August 17th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    I really enjoyed the material and feel like I learned the basics quite well. My instructional team was great, and I had a great 3 months of learning. Not everyone is on the same level though and it really feels like it's just a money making business. Get as many students into a classroom as you can, regardless of skill level or aptitude (as long as they're paying) and make promises of how easy getting a job will be (not easy). Again, instructors and curriculum was great. The outcomes program and just other general aspects of the school were really lacking. I sort of completed the course with an icky feeling of having been scammed.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 14th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    GA gave me lots of tools and resources to succeed. All of my instructors were passionate and inspired me to learn at an accelerated pace. My school also provided me with career guidance through a talented coach, which helped me land a job within 3 months of graduating.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 14th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    I thought it was a really good program. I learned a lot and it was hard but worth it in the end, and fun.

    Answered by graduate Katy F on September 14th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    I had an enjoyable time here, and learned a ton in 12 weeks. I thought the instructors were informative and supportive. I took off a star due to how difficult it has been to find a job afterwards- their marketing stats are seriously skewed.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 14th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    My only issue with GA is admissions -- they seemed to let quite a few people into my particular cohort who were not qualified/did not have the right aptitude. I think this held our entire class back.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 14th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    Class size to teacher/assistant ratio was not great. They did cover all the basics to become a 'full stack developer'. Student acceptance filter should be greater.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 14th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    General Assembly was great experience! They taught me so much and I feel confident in my new skills. The reason I gave it a 4/5 is because even though we were taught a lot, there was still SO much we didn't learn for time sake. You must make it a point to continue learning after the course is complete or you might lose it. Also, don't expect to be a full-fledged web developer when you graduate. Most of the grads from class started small but are working their way up.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 14th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    One instructor was fantastic and very invested in the success of the class. The other instructor clearly checked out about a month into the course leaving many students feeling like half the day was being wasted and could be completed by reading through the lessons ourselves. Additionally, we moved campuses from WeWork to a private floor at the Seattle Tower halfway through the course. The new location is incredibly loud due to outside noise and the amenities pale in comparison. Post-course, job support has been provided, but simply put the GA WDI course does not adequately prepare anyone with enough experience to get immediately hired on in the competitive Seattle market.

    Answered by graduate Derek N on September 14th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    My teachers were great and I learned a lot. But the ease of finding a job afterwards and the salary you would get were greatly misrepresented. Career coach and job leads available through GA were not very helpful.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 14th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    I think that it was a great program and I learned a lot; however, I felt that the material was a bit too jam-packed. Walking away, I felt that I learned a good overview in multiple areas, but it would've been more beneficial for us to get a really good foundation on just 2-3 topics relevant to what's trending. It would better prepare us for the actual job qualifications we face as junior web developers (and not to mention - it would improve our confidence if we are entering a brand new field).

    Answered by Anonymous on September 15th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    I came into the program knowing very little and walked out with a Web Development job fairly quickly. You need to have the right attitude to succeede in the course but they do give everyone an equal chance to be successful. The only reason it's not a 5 star rating is because at the end of the course it seemed like we were going into lab rat mode. I understand technology changes fast but it showed that the structure towards the end was lacking preparation.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 19th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    Overall, I gained a huge amount from the immersive I took. I would not be at the job, nor skill-level that I am at today without General Assembly. The instructors were mostly great. They delivered a massive amount of material in well-structured classes. That said, I do have some complaints. At the time I did my Immersive, the school was growing rapidly (as I'm sure it still is). There was a lot of shuffling of students as new campus locations opened up. At one point, we were forced to sit through hours of construction noise (from an unrelated project next door) until they finished one of the other campus locations we could move to. In addition, midway through our program, our chief instructor left, meaning we had to start fresh with someone new. Thankfully, the instructor who came in was also great, but we lost valuable time establishing what we had and hadn't already covered with our new instructor. The team handling our transition to employment was fantastic, but I was offered free classes for the inconvenience of switching location, construction noise, and our chief instructor. Since then, I've moved through two jobs, and have been growing my skills well beyond what we covered in the Immersive. Still, I would really like to come back and continue learning at General Assembly. I hope the free courses will be honored.

    Answered by graduate Declan Welie on September 15th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    The people and materials were top notch.

    Answered by graduate Misha Herscu on September 15th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    Overall a great program and good instructors.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 17th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    There is no job guaranteed after graduation...the outcomes team do not really help you. The graduation rates that they say is for sure a statistically lie. Other than than I thought the program was great, I learned a lot from it.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 19th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    It touched the surface of a lot of concepts but could have dove deeper into the backend, databases, and frontend UI's.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 19th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    I appreciated the class format, schedule and lessons but there is always room for improvement.

    Answered by graduate Carolyn Cochran on September 19th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    The program gave me a set of skills and a foundation to build on. It changed my career path and got me started down a path that I'm still walking/occasionally running. As with any bootcamp, the pace was rapid and I was over my head. That's probably the idea, but it still was quite hard/frustrating.

    Answered by graduate Will Smith on September 19th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    GA provided outcome support, although they cut off support once one finds a job. There's support from TA's and resources available for those who need/want it. I thought the pace of the bootcamp was a little slow for people who had little to some exposure to programming before.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 19th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    I give a 4 out of 5 because each experience is personal. The class went by very fast and while I learned a lot, it was too short a time. The cost is also prohibitive for a lot of people. Understanding the barriers to entry into the coding world is also important. I do not have a job in web development or really any development. Right now I work in IT for Nissan which is what I used to do before.

    Answered by graduate Daimeon Pilcher on September 19th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    It taught me how to learn. GA instructors made sure we were asking the right kind of questions, so we can get to the root of the problem.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 19th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    Decent program with very intelligent and competent developers as teachers. Would be better to have teachers as developers. The curriculum structure should be adjusted to focus on completing projects rather than rushed thrown together code.

    Answered by graduate Kevin Merritt on September 19th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    I learned so much! And it was a supportive environment to do so. It is impossible to learn it all, but I wouldn't be where I am without the knowledge and practice the program gave me. Although, beware it's tough. You have to make sure you are following every step of the way or you may get overwhelmed.

    Answered by graduate Celeste G on September 20th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    I probably would have given a 3.5. I feel like there are better bootcamps out there that teach the material in a competitive way. Schools like App Academy and Flat Iron School also stress Comp Sci fundamentals so that their grads don't blank and embarrass themselves on interviews. However, I did learn a lot at GA and was left with the skills to teach myself new languages which is an incredibly useful skill-set to have.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 20th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    General assembly has a great curriculum that is somewhat overshadowed by the fact that it graduates hundreds of people each year who are not adequately prepared for a career yet.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 20th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    The training is very good. The job placement support, heavily advertised in the pitch, is utterly non-existent. It's a great place to learn coding, but the promise of the Outcomes department is essentially a flat-out lie and there's no just way around that.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 20th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    I had a great experience at General Assembly overall. Our main instructor was absolutely amazing and the support after we graduated was phenomenal as well.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 20th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    They teach you relevant skills that prepare for a career as a dev.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 20th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    the curriculum was well structured; the instructors were very talented and knowledgeable; we had lots of support from tutors during class and after hours; great support from their placement personnel; lots of post-graduate get togethers, ongoing tutoring, meet-ups, etc.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 20th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    The class was great, our teachers and the other students were awesome. There's a lot to cram in with a very short time to do it, but I think they did the best they could with the time we had. I think the "outcomes"/job placement was pretty terrible, but the class itself was amazing.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 20th, 2016

  • General Assembly Web Development Immersive review

    Learned the needed skills to transition into new career. That was the point of the boot camp and they delivered. I am 7 months into my first web Dev job.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 21st, 2016

  • General Assembly User Experience Design Immersive review

    The instruction was good but there were a lot of empty promises made. When I realised after the course that they were not going to follow through on a lot of what they'd promised, I strongly regretted putting so much money and time on the line.

    Answered by Anonymous on September 15th, 2016

  • General Assembly User Experience Design Immersive review

    It was more the instructor. Luke Miller was very informative during our session. I am not sure if he works with GA anymore.

    Answered by graduate David O on September 19th, 2016

Talk with General Assembly graduates

Ask your question

Bootcamp grads love to talk. We'll find students from General Assembly to answer your questions.

Verfied answers from graduates of this school will include this badge

What kind of career service do they have?

Posted by Tatiana Tylosky on September 6th, 2016

Answer
How would you describe the culture at General Assembly?

Posted by Thinkful on September 15th, 2016

Answer

Decent enough. People were courteous. I didn't form any real lasting relationships there.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

Everyone was fairly collaborative and nice to work with.

Answered by graduate David O on September 19th, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Thinkful on September 15th, 2016

Answer

For the most part quite good, if a little overconfident about General Assembly as an investment.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

very

Answered by graduate David O on September 19th, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Thinkful on September 15th, 2016

Answer

Don't trust them. They're there to make money from you as a student. They can promise all kinds of help with your job search later and then pocket your money and not follow through on it.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

Don't partner with someone who didnt come to class prepared.

Answered by graduate David O on September 19th, 2016

How many students are in a typical cohort?

Posted by Tatiana Tylosky on August 23rd, 2016

Answer
How would you describe the culture at General Assembly?

Posted by Anonymous on July 28th, 2016

Answer

They seem most interested in getting your $. There's a ton of self learning that happens, and is good, but I can do that for free. What I learned at GA wasn't worth the time or $ I invested.

Answered by graduate Anthony S on July 28th, 2016

The instructors at GA are immersed in their respective fields which helps tie in real world experience to lessons. They are usually available for help if need be. Students seem welcoming and GA fosters collaborative spacing on campus to discuss topics or review work.

Answered by graduate Samantha S on July 29th, 2016

Vibrant, active, supportive, friendly. They always have fun, relevant activities to connect you with people. Socials with startups, talks with founders and great parties.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on July 30th, 2016

It is a very dynamic, high energy, productive environment where everyone works very hard to teach and learn. People from all backgrounds join each other here to make the next career stop.

Answered by graduate Hoa Newton on August 1st, 2016

We were the third class at that campus, so it still had a 'wild west' feel - which was incredible. Instructors adapted their teaching styles, and as a class we worked hard + celebrated hard. Unfortunately, I think it's become a lot more corporate.

Answered by graduate Jonathan Igner on August 1st, 2016

Supportive, and encouraging. There is a strong peer-to-peer culture, and they work hard to make the campus feel open and welcoming to all--guests, alumni, friends/family, current students, prospective students. There were lots of white walls, bright lights and almost all surfaces were dry-erase friendly.

Answered by graduate Juli Emmel on August 2nd, 2016

The GA staff are energetic and supportive, and overall cultivate a culture of mutual support. I think they are so popular that it felt impersonal so you had to make the effort to get involved and seize the opportunities and make the community your own. The part time students didn't self-organize into study groups, for example.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 2nd, 2016

Everyone is very supportive. In the open work spaces there is always a lot of chatter of people working together and helping each other. It's an intense experience and everyone is in the same boat, so they help each other out.

Answered by graduate Wake Lankard on August 3rd, 2016

It's great, everyone is extremely helpful and friendly. Everyone is more than willing to help if you need it. There is no pressure and no judgement if you learn slower than others

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 3rd, 2016

The culture at galvanize is hard to explain as we were in a smaller campus. You have the employees of galvanize some tech, and others just workers. The businesses/startup community in the atrium, and then us learning about tech in a separate room. Overall it was a Tech community that usually bonds through going out and drinking, which i couldn't do as i am under 21. The culture is welcoming and willing to help.

Answered by graduate Kyle Maxwell on August 17th, 2016

It's a great culture with a very friendly atmosphere. Everyone that works there is incredibly friendly and welcoming. The events that they have weekly are also very educational.

Answered by graduate Sean P on August 16th, 2016

The staff encouraged independent learning & fostered curiosity. The career development team was very good - very experienced & exposed us to many local employers from all different aspects of working as a programmer and job hunting.

Answered by graduate Nicole P on August 17th, 2016

Open, but generally the students tend to be a little lazy and many people drop out after the first 2 weeks. But it's more open than other bootcamps b/c virtually every one gets in.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

Laid back and supportive. Everyone is there to help everyone else. They have several classes going on at the same time and encourage you all to work together.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

solid. people wanna learn.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

Everyone is nice and respectful. Lots of smiles and GA "school pride" sweatshirts all around. The outcomes career coach my cohort got was just awful though. The outcomes part is lacking, but this guy was just the worst...and a terrible instructor as well who made me feel uncomfortable in class more than once.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

Instructors and students are very supportive. The environment is very conducive to learning and collaboration.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

I had a lot of fun in the program, the community/culture is really great. I made some really great friends that I still keep in touch with. The class atmosphere is a good mix of independent and collaborative. You end up spending a lot of time with the same people which can go either way, but my cohort was pretty close.

Answered by graduate Katy F on September 14th, 2016

Open, supportive. You get to meet smart people from different backgrounds.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

fun, accepting

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

The environment was great. It was a very supportive community. I had no issues with other students, faculty, or administration.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

Very relaxed. The teachers and TA's was very friendly and SUPER helpful with questions. I wish they would've challenged us more and not given us the answers to our coding questions right away, but instead pushed us to do more research to find the answers.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

The culture was great and everyone does want to see each individual succeed as long as they are willing to put in the work required. This is not a school for people who like to isolate themselves. Group work and communication are key just as in a workplace environment.

Answered by graduate Derek N on September 14th, 2016

People were super nice and cooperative. People had a lot of integrity. You could leave your computer somewhere for hours and no one would bother it. That just amazed me.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

I think the culture is great. Everyone is very friendly and people are usually very willing to help. Our class got lucky because we had one amazing instructor named Tom Dyer. Tom would stay late night and help students who were struggling with their projects. He was the best!

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

CuLauren was great. I was a good learning environment. Walked out making some really good friends

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

I enjoyed my time, and made friends, but the culture when I attended was very male-centric. There is a very positive ethos around helping one another learn, but partly because of the number of guys in the program, there is a certain amount of (macho) competition. I could see it being a somewhat difficult environment for a woman (which is true of a lot of the tech world).

Answered by graduate Declan Welie on September 15th, 2016

Practical over theoretical, social, fun.

Answered by graduate Misha Herscu on September 15th, 2016

The culture was professional but also fun

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 17th, 2016

Culture is great! 5/5

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

A solid 4. I felt generally valued, and very supported.

Answered by graduate Carolyn Cochran on September 19th, 2016

A real potpourri of characters. I think the institution and venue thinks of themselves as hipster-chic, but my classmates were people from all backgrounds/life situations.

Answered by graduate Will Smith on September 19th, 2016

The location might have something to do with the culture, but I would describe GA as a nice blend of the hustle and bustle of NYC and the relaxed vibe that comes from the nearby attractions such as Madison Square Park. Everyone is generally very nice, relaxed and supportive.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

The culture is great! The staff really want to help you and the students get along great. There were a few hiccups along the way but that's to be expected anywhere. We are human after all. I will say some of the staff seem stretched thin because there are always new cohorts coming through so the support after the fact is limited.

Answered by graduate Daimeon Pilcher on September 19th, 2016

Nose to the grind stone. A sense of collective will where everyone has put their past lives aside to start anew.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Really fun, positive, and intelligent.

Answered by graduate Kevin Merritt on September 19th, 2016

Positive. My cohort was diverse, people from all different backgrounds and ages. Everyone helped eachother in some way or another.

Answered by graduate Celeste G on September 20th, 2016

Everyone was incredibly respectful and positive and collaborative. There were some outliers, but for the most part every single person I met was open, helpful, and friendly.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Culture is great

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Very nicely and respectfully. Maybe a little too much. Any remarks that don't toe a very particular line of sensitivity are not welcome in the Slack.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

The culture at General Assembly is very collaborative and welcoming. Everyone is super friendly and our cohort all worked together quite well and enjoyed working in groups as well as individually. In addition, as GA is based out of a co-working space, there is always lots of tech related events and companies around.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

very laid back. My cohort became very tight. We are still friends and keep in touch.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

inclusive and friendly; fairly diverse; overall a good environment

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Our class was great and very friendly. Everyone was willing to help out and pitch in if someone was struggling. No one seemed like dead weight.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Very friendly. Lifelong friendships.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 21st, 2016

How effective were your instructors?

Posted by Anonymous on July 28th, 2016

Answer

It's a grab bag. One instructor left mid-cohort. Another started dating our course moderator. The best instructors seemed in a hurry to get on to a different job.

Answered by graduate Anthony S on July 28th, 2016

Instructors seem very knowledgeable in what they teach. They also tie in real world examples and applications to make the course work more relevant.

Answered by graduate Samantha S on July 29th, 2016

Incredibly effective, when class ends they stay sometimes until 11 pm to keep teaching you when you don't get something. My instructors were warm and generous.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on July 30th, 2016

My instructors were great. They were not only sharp in coding but also very understanding. They were always their to answer my questions encouraged me to keep trying when I felt like hitting wall.

Answered by graduate Hoa Newton on August 1st, 2016

Very effective. Each had their strengths and weaknesses, but all brought a specific niched knowledge/teaching style to the table. At GA, the classes are split up by instructor expertise, and office hours allow you to get further direction from all instructors.

Answered by graduate Jonathan Igner on August 1st, 2016

Each instructor had their strengths, but also their weaknesses. I had three instructors-- two of them were fullstack friendly and frontend savvy, the other much more knowledgeable about security and best practices for database development. And nobody knows everything all the time, so watching how they research and debug is extremely valuable!

Answered by graduate Juli Emmel on August 2nd, 2016

My instructors overall were industry veterans with a lot of knowledge. The part time instructors had full time jobs but still found time for my questions that came up during the day.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 2nd, 2016

The instructors were very supportive and knowledgeable. The relationship feels more like a team effort with the goal being for the students to know basic web development.

Answered by graduate Wake Lankard on August 3rd, 2016

Very effective. I learned a lot and was able to apply that knowledge to working on side projects. They were willing to help me outside of class time and after the course was over.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 3rd, 2016

The instructors were very good, but that is also because we got to know them and vice versa, so they figured out the best way to teach the individuals. We had some of our FSRs/TAs leave which was a bummer as they were very helpful. The instructors did a good job teaching, but it mainly fell on one of them.

Answered by graduate Kyle Maxwell on August 17th, 2016

Knowledgable and approachable. They were also open to listening to their students and adjusting their teaching style accordingly. They all have real world experience.

Answered by graduate Sean P on August 16th, 2016

My particular group had 5 instructors so while we had a good exposure to all of their different expertise, they all had their strengths and weaknesses. Overall they were very knowledgable but it was a challenge for them to maintain a consistent learning approach with so many instructors.

Answered by graduate Nicole P on August 17th, 2016

2 were excellent coders with limited teaching experience and skill, the other was a pretty bad at teaching and understadning basic concepts

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

I personally think mine were the best. Full knowledge of real world work experience and very engaging. Very supportive and intuitive to your needs.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

Very effective, but other cohorts weren't as lucky.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

Instructors were all incredibly helpful. All at different levels and with different strengths so we got a really well rounded approach.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

The instructors were enthusiastic and passionate. They welcomed questions and shared all sorts of anecdotes from their professional career.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

Overall I thought they were all pretty effective. They encouraged working through problems on your own (aka they won't just give you the answers when you ask). The only complaint I would have would be that they would occasionally forget that we were total beginners and would glaze over topics we didn't understand.

Answered by graduate Katy F on September 14th, 2016

Superb. Not a single complaint.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Mine were organized and smart. I don't remember them being unable to help me with a question.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

Instructors were very helpful. However, the knowledge of the instructors on the course material or web development in general varied depending on their experience. Students turned instructors appeared to be less helpful due to their knowledge limitations. Solving issues is not always the same as understanding the issue.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

Pretty effective and great explainers. Most of us weren't coming from a coding background so they were very patient and clear with their teachings. The only thing I'd change is we had frequent changes to our teachers, which caused a bit of confusion and miscommunication between the lessons. More consistency would've been nice.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

I had an absolutely stellar main instructor for the first few weeks, and his replacement was really skilled at giving a blank canvas of energy when dealing with student frustrations or downright panic.

Answered by graduate Carolyn Cochran on September 19th, 2016

As I stated earlier, one instructor was always resourceful and aimed to help/give guidance whenever possible. He continues to be a friend to many of us to this day. The other instructor was in his last course of his contract and his attitude towards students was apparent that he simply didn't care and was quite terse in his answers to any questions.

Answered by graduate Derek N on September 14th, 2016

The two I had primarily were really, really good. I heard other teachers were not so good.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

Most of the instructors were difficult to learn from and I think that the bootcamp should consider hiring actual professors or people certified in teaching. We had one instructor who was difficult to understand. He would mumble and actively get nervous teaching in front of the class and would have to take panic attack breaks. I think the vetting process for instructors should be more stringent.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

Overall, our instructors were great. We had one UI specialist, who was not the best (and who later left the school). As I mentioned above, it was also pretty unfortunate to have our lead instructor leave midway through our program.

Answered by graduate Declan Welie on September 15th, 2016

extremely effective.

Answered by graduate Misha Herscu on September 15th, 2016

Mostly well-prepared and helpful. There were times at near the end when they semi-checked out.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 17th, 2016

Teachers were good, they could have went deeper into each topic but it might have been too much for some students to handle.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

The instructors do push you a little to be independent and research a little but if you get totally stuck they do take the time to work it out with you. The lectures themselves are fast paced but they do come with a lot of practice to help you understand it

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

The hardest thing for GA is the quality/vetting of instructors. Our lead was a first-time teacher - the assistant teachers were more experienced, but often times I found myself wishing they were leading the class.

Answered by graduate Will Smith on September 19th, 2016

The instructors were pretty helpful. Some were more helpful than others, but overall very supportive. They were invested in our success and would occasionally check up on us.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

My instructors were great! All three. They each had different teaching and helping styles which at times was frustrating, but understandable because you will come across all types when you're out in the real world. People who would rather just do, people who would help by guiding to the right answers, and people who offer a million different tools and ways to get to the right answer without giving a solution.

Answered by graduate Daimeon Pilcher on September 19th, 2016

Great. I don't think GA instructors are necessarily all top notch, but ours were great in terms of how balanced their team was. The variety of teaching styles and approaches broke up the grind.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

They were effective and incredibly knowledgeable. They did a very good job in regards to the constraints of the program.

Answered by graduate Kevin Merritt on September 19th, 2016

Effective. They all liked each other, which helped keep the vibe playful, while we learned tough stuff.

Answered by graduate Celeste G on September 20th, 2016

The instructors were amazing. They devoted a ton of time to helping students but also encouraged us to figure things out on our own. They have to navigate a lot of very stressed and desperate adults and I give them nothing but credit for doing what they do with tact, humor, and intelligence.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

My instructors were fantastic.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Our instructors overall were good. Our main instructor, James, was simply fantastic and he had the best energy and truly loves helping other people learn. Our TA at the time, Jim was also an extremely useful resource since he had just completed the program before us and understood exactly what we were going through. Our secondary instructor who technically was our other co-instructor was not as invested in the teaching process, but still had good intentions.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Very effective. One was new and was very open to receiving feedback. His teaching skills improved greatly throughout the course.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

i thought they did a great job. That was my personal experience - i've heard otherwise from another attendee in a different city.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

They were excellent, always putting things in terms we understood and doing whatever they could do to get us excited.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Extremely attentive and helpful. They really wanted me to understand the material.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 21st, 2016

What advice would you give a new student?

Posted by Anonymous on July 28th, 2016

Answer

Exhaust all other learning options before spending money at GA. Waaaaaay overpriced for what you get out of it. Many students I went through the course also spent months looking for work afterward. Don't be sucked in by recruitment tactics. Also, GA in 2014 had a bad reputation already, so not mentioning it was beneficial in some interviews.

Answered by graduate Anthony S on July 28th, 2016

If you cannot commit to a workshop or immersive experience, the one-off classes are great for getting your feet wet. It will also help narrow down fields of study you may like better.

Answered by graduate Samantha S on July 29th, 2016

Learn as much as you can before you attend, so you can get the most out of it. Dedicate yourself to it while you are there and don't try to work part time while you do this.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on July 30th, 2016

Speaking from my experience, I think coding is very challenging especially for newbies. Getting the momentum and support is very important (unless you were born a genius :)) because there will be times when you get lost and feel like you have hit the wall. Find your community, start coding and stick with it until you succeed.

Answered by graduate Hoa Newton on August 1st, 2016

You're going to hit a valley somewhere between 50% and 75% through the class. You will likely consider quitting, even if you've been a top student in any of your other endeavors. The material just won't make any sense. Then come week 7 or 8, you learn a final piece that somehow ties the other disparate pieces of web dev knowledge together. You see the full picture. Push through the valley, and concentrate on the basics.

Answered by graduate Jonathan Igner on August 1st, 2016

No one can teach you to be a good developer, the best they can do is lead you on the right path of discovery. The workforce has so many options, and quite often they are very specialized. Focus most on the things you like, and want to be doing with your professional life.

Answered by graduate Juli Emmel on August 2nd, 2016

Go to as many GA events as possible - they have a ton of great speakers come through. Make your own study groups. Do the homework and put time in every day. Don't miss a class. Join coding meet ups.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 2nd, 2016

I've met several students who got stressed out. Remember that there is no exam. You can't fail. If you work hard you will come out of it knowing much more than you did going in, even if you don't remember everything. The teachers are there to help you learn, not just present information for you to learn yourself. A new student once asked me when the moment happens that everything clicks and you feel like you got it. It never happens. You never totally get what is being taught that day, but you find yourself effectively using the lessons that were taught the week before. And when you're finished you'll still know how to make a website even if you don't remember every detail.

Answered by graduate Wake Lankard on August 3rd, 2016

Try to pay attention as much as possible and follow along on your own laptops when the instructors type things so you can learn more effectively

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 3rd, 2016

Just be ready to work hard for the 6 months there. Be ready to learn and really try and absorb it. Really dive into some of the technologies there and become an expert, don't just learn a couple things from everything.

Answered by graduate Kyle Maxwell on August 17th, 2016

Do your pre-work. Don;t be afraid to ask questions, and be prepared for how over whelmed you will feel. It will pass, and you will find that you have learned a huge amount.

Answered by graduate Sean P on August 16th, 2016

With any bootcamp, be prepared to completely immerse yourself and never hesitate to use any resource to learn (internet, various free & paid courses, peers, books, podcasts, etc) because there are so many out there. If there's something you've never heard of then look it up. If you're not sure how something works, then break it first to see all the moving parts. With programing you have the luxury of turning off parts and turning them back on unlike a physical machine like a car, for example.

Answered by graduate Nicole P on August 17th, 2016

This is an immersive program. Come prepared to completely immerse yourself in code for 3 months, non-stop. It will be frustrating... but persevere. Everyone is going through the same thing.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

Study A LOT before you start. it will make the experience 10x better

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

learn the basics in javascript before taking a course. study the mvc pattern.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on August 17th, 2016

Half of GA is learning to code. The other half is going to meetups and networking in your city.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Choose your bootcamp wisely. I think there are better options out there, and GA would definitely not be my first choice if I were to do this again...unless I was just doing it for the fun of it.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

Be prepared to put your personal life completely on hold since you will be living and breathing code. Make sure you have enough savings to last you 6-9 months (3 months of the GA program and 3-6 months of the job search). Make friends while in the program since you will need all the help you can get. Some days will be really hard and you will feel like a failure - know that it's completely normal and everyone feels like that. Just keep going and keep asking for help if you can't find an answer online. Know that you will need to keep learning after you'll graduate. During the interviews, I was always asked about what I've been learning/ working on post-graduation. Make sure to learn TDD/ BDD. Go to meetups and talk to people. Surround yourself with supportive people.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

It is a lot of hard work, and at the beginning it seems so confusing and crazy, but I think the best thing for me was time. Like anything, practice makes perfect. By the end of the course, I was looking back at the stuff that had me so confused at the start, and it seemed so easy.

Answered by graduate Katy F on September 14th, 2016

Definitely not to take their job stats seriously. I think only half my class had found something by the 3 month mark, some of those positions were not permanent. The market is hard, and it takes a lot of hustling. Coding is not a viable career for everyone--although there is now more variety in coding jobs, where it might be just as important to have something like design or writing skills, if you don't discover a talent it can be a huge struggle. And the market is only getting more saturated.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

For any student joining a bootcamp my recommendation is to do research on the actual instructor you will be assigned to. Look for experienced instructors. That is the key to learning a lot. However, whether or not the instructor will be a good teacher/mentor is pretty much up in the air.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

Don't feel intimidated because you don't know anything related to code. You will learn it from the ground up so you don't need any experience! But ask a million questions, and keep notes. I relate back to my notes to this day!

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

Be prepared to work 12+ hours a day during the course. Any pre-work you do in addition to pre-work assigned will be of great assistance to yourself as the first few weeks is drinking from a fire hose. If you can get any technology industry experience prior to the course, you will greatly increase your chances of being hired post-course.

Answered by graduate Derek N on September 14th, 2016

Be completely dedicated to your schoolwork - daytime, evenings, and weekends. Get sleep for sure, but don't try to plan social life stuff during bootcamp.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 14th, 2016

Work hard. Don't forget to have fun and make friends. I walked away with some friendships that I know will last a long time, hopefully forever.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 15th, 2016

Make sure you can afford to be out of work for a good 5-6 months. Class is 3 months & finding a job is nowhere near immediate - even if you're a "unicorn".

Answered by graduate Carolyn Cochran on September 19th, 2016

Be ready to work! Also, when it comes to the final projects, as important as the technical components are, it's imperative to have an interesting idea.

Answered by graduate Declan Welie on September 15th, 2016

Listen to the teachers and work hard.

Answered by graduate Misha Herscu on September 15th, 2016

You will get out of the program what you put into it. Getting a job will be difficult; you will have to work hard beyond the program to build a personal portfolio and stand out, especially if you have no experience.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 17th, 2016

You're going to be unemployed for at least 6 months. So save money! and be prepared if you're ended up not working in the tech field.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Prepare a lot prior to the first day of school so it is not overwhelming when they rush through the basic concepts of HTML, CSS, and JS fundamentals.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

It's not for everybody. As long as you have a mindset to succeede and put in the hard work you will do great. This skill can't be handed to you on a platter.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

Dont' get frustrated, don't quit, and don't be afraid to be completely selfish. In other words, learn as much as you can in the short amount of time you have there.

Answered by graduate Will Smith on September 19th, 2016

You get out as much as you put in. Work hard, do as much challenges as you can, and help others out. You learn a lot from helping a fellow classmate.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 19th, 2016

My advice is to drop everything else in your life. You need to in order to be successful. Don't be afraid to ask for help whether it's from a TA, a Developer In Residence (DIR) or from your teachers. Also the career development staff are there for you as well, but come prepared.

Answered by graduate Daimeon Pilcher on September 19th, 2016

Find out what languages you're going to be working with and take introductory courses online beforehand. Also think up project ideas to code in those languages beforehand as well. Basically, have goals and projects already thought out.

Answered by graduate Kevin Merritt on September 19th, 2016

Make sure you're ready to devote three months to it, because destructions aren't really an option.

Answered by graduate Celeste G on September 20th, 2016

Be one with the discomfort. Learn to embrace uncertainty. I have always had a hard time in situations where I feel like I don't know what I'm doing. But that is the majority of your life coding, especially at the start. I think embracing the discomfort was the most freeing thing I could have done.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Make sure you know why you're going to GA

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Just to be patient with yourself and realize that it might take a little bit for some concepts to fully sink in and that is okay.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Make sure that you don't have anything that might distract you while you're in the course. You will get out what you put into it.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Be prepared to put everything in your life on hold for 12 weeks - the coursework is roughly 60+ hours per week. Take advantage of after-hours tutoring and don't try to power through it alone. Don't fall behind. If you have having trouble grasping some concepts, keep up with the current lesson and go back and rework whatever you are having trouble with.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

Graduating is very hard, but only half as hard as finding a job afterwards.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 20th, 2016

You won't learn everything perfectly. If you retain half of what they throw at you you are in good shape. It will be difficult but you will learn to write code. Keep learning after the course.

Answered by an anonymous graduate on September 21st, 2016

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