How to become a web developer - 4 possible paths

There are many different ways to learn to code and become a web developer. What works best for you depends on your learning style, resources, and time commitment. Here is an in-depth look at the most common ways you can make the career change to become a web developer.

Computer Science undergraduate:

This is the traditional web developer path, but for those of you who can’t afford to go to a 4 year college at this point in your life, it’s not the only path. If you’re planning to attend college soon and have a passion for computers that goes beyond just building websites that work, this is the path for you.

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Self-taught programmer:

For most people, this is the hardest option. If you have no problem being disciplined and struggling in solitude, this is for you. You need to be OK being stuck and challenged on a regular basis. You’ll be the first to understand that Googling is a skill that programmers will spend a lifetime honing.

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Full-Time Bootcamp student:

This option is best for those who can quit their jobs and devote all their time to learning to code for several months. With this option, not only will you learn the fastest and have the most accountability, but you will gain critical collaboration skills by working with your peers every day.

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Part-Time Bootcamp student:

If you want accountability and the ability to learn best practices but cannot commit to a full-time program, this is the best choice for you. Also some people work better 1-on-1 or on their own than with a large group.

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Cons:

All in all, there is no one right way to learn programming and as you can see, there are pros and cons with each. The outcome of each of these options depends greatly on your own personality, commitment, and experiences. The important thing to realize is that regardless of your path you can have success if you put in the effort.